Topic | 2019-2020 Curriculum & Schedule

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • Alysee123
    Participant

    We just received our curriculum for the 2019/2020 year! I’ve revamped a TON since I started planning in January.

    I will have a 4th grader, 2nd grader(gifted) and 1st grader.

    Doing things a bit more scheduled but more interest led since it’s my first year with 3!

    <b>4th Grader/2nd Grader</b>

    Teaching Textbooks

    WriteShop B

    Copywork/Dictation: From fiction

    Easy Grammar 2/4

    Sassafrass Science Book 1+2(there choice)

    Nature Study – 1x a month with a group of kids

    Visits to Europe & North America

    <b>1st Grader</b>

    Handwriting Without Tears than transitioning to short sentences.

    JUMP Math Grade 1

    Sassafrass Science Book 1+2(there choice)

    Visits to Europe & North America

    Delightful Reading Level 2

    I doubt we will finish it all but we have somewhere to start.

    Amanda
    Participant

    Looks good! Here’s mine- 5th, 2nd, and Kindergarten

     

    Math- CLE (5th & 2nd; R&S book series for K)

    History- SCM, combining Egypt, Greece and Rome

    Geo- DIY visits to Africa & Middle East

    English (mostly done orally) & spelling- R&S (5th & 2nd)

    Handwriting- copywork 5th, SCM Print to Cursive for 2nd

    Astronomy study using lots of living books

    Nature study

    Latin- Vocab from Classical Roots (5th)

    Weekly writing assignments- some creative, some written narrations- 5th

    Art- watercolor instruction book + seasonal projects (we LOVE art!!)

    Poetry & artist study? (I always have good intentions, but….)

    Lamb’s Shakespeare?? (see above, haha!)

    Will read a “Miller’s” book, probably the one about Proverbs

    Several Literature selections for all 3

     

    I feel a bit like a traitor on some things because I started out as a complete CM purist, but I’ve definitely had to adjust curriculum choices to fit my children rather than my ideals. Example- spelling. My now 4th-grader could NOT spell even easy words no matter how much dictation we did! That, for him, didn’t translate to spelling knowledge (he is terribly literal). So we tried R&S spelling this year and he is doing SO GREAT. His spelling skills have really blossomed- he needed concrete rules. So we do what works!

     

     

    Tristan
    Participant

    I love these sorts of posts! Here is my plan so far for fall. It will be so strange because my oldest graduates next month and heads off to college in another state in the fall, but I will still have 9 kids at home, the following grades: 9th, 8th, 6th, 5th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st, with a tagalong PreK and Toddler who don’t have any formal lessons.

    9th grade boy:

    • The Good and the Beautiful Language Arts level 6 (this has reading, writing, grammar, art, geography, punctuation/editing, sentence dictation).
    • Apologia Biology with labs
    • History of Science – he requested this topic so I’m creating a course for him with Hakim’s science books as a spine and some books about scientists and discoveries he’ll be interested in. We will include more geography in this as we plot where people lived and where discoveries happened. Some written narration in this too of course.
    • Math U See Algebra 1
    • Film Studies (elective, still figuring out resources for this one).
    • Piano
    • One more elective – he is still deciding.

    8th Grade girl:

    • The Good and the Beautiful Language Arts level 6 (this has reading, writing, grammar, art, geography, punctuation/editing, sentence dictation).
    • Apologia Biology with labs
    • History 2 from The Good and the Beautiful. This is done as a group with all the younger kids. Some written narration in this.
    • Math U See Algebra 1
    • Art – This child is very artistic and has set goals in this area.
    • One more topic, she’s still deciding.

    6th Grade boy:

    • The Good and the Beautiful Language Arts level 5 (has same sort of things level 6 does).
    • History 2 from The Good and the Beautiful. Some written narration in this.
    • Science – still deciding. This will be a group of my 1st-6th graders. Possibly using an Apologia Elementary book as a spine.
    • Piano
    • Math U See Pre-Algebra
    • One more subject, he is still deciding.

    5th Grade boy:

    • The Good and the Beautiful Language Arts level 3.
    • History 2 from The Good and the Beautiful.
    • Science – still deciding.
    • Piano
    • Math U See Epsilon
    • All About Spelling level 3 and 4
    • Brave Writer projects (Partnership Writing stage)
    • Copywork/Transitioning to dictation.

    3rd Grade boy:

    • All About Reading level 3 and 4
    • History 2 from The Good and the Beautiful.
    • Math U See Gamma
    • All About Spelling level 2 and 3
    • Science – still deciding.
    • Brave Writer Projects (Partnership Writing stage)
    • Copywork
    • Piano
    • Art

    2nd Grade boy:

    • All About Reading level 4
    • Math U See Beta
    • History 2 from The Good and the Beautiful
    • All About Spelling level 1.
    • Science – still deciding
    • Brave Writer projects (Jot it Down stage)
    • Copywork
    • Piano
    • Art

    1st Grade boy:

    • All About Reading level 2
    • Math U See Alpha
    • History 2 from The Good and the Beautiful
    • Science – Still deciding
    • Copywork
    • Brave Writer projects (Jot it Down stage)
    • Piano
    • Art

    PreK boy and Toddler girl:

    • Play! No school work. No formal lessons. They can join the big kids (aka, get into things, watch science experiments, color or draw while big kids are writing) but nothing planned, scheduled, or instigated by me.

    Phew! We also will do some group learning for nature study, hymns, scripture study, composers/artists study, PE.

    ErinD
    Participant

    @Amanda – Don’t feel like a traitor at all. Doing what works for your kids is much more important than sticking with a particular style!

    @Tristan – My son did a film-making elective last year and I got him the book Attack of the Killer Video Book. It’s written to teens and he found it somewhat useful. Just a suggestion as you look for film resources.

    I think I have most of next year decided. It’s my last year with 5 students and I’m graduating my first!

    12th grade:

    • Consumer math plus maybe some basic trig and anything else he wants to review
    • English – book list, essays and narrations, some technical writing
    • Conceptual Physics and the Physics 101 DVD
    • Canadian history
    • Health, PE and one more elective (he needs to pick)

    10th grade:

    • MUS Geometry
    • English – book list, essays and narrations
    • Science – still deciding between Master Books’ Geology and PAC Chemistry with Chem 101 DVD
    • World history Part 2 (Notgrass)
    • Intro to Rhetoric, PE and one more elective (he needs to pick)

    8th grade:

    • TT Pre-algebra
    • LLATL Gray
    • narrations and outlines across subjects, learning essays, learning lit. terms with Abeka World Literature
    • Apologia Physical science
    • The Fallacy Detective and the Thinking Toolbox

    6th grade:

    • TT 6
    • R&S English 5, Spelling 6, narrations and outlines across subjects, Pathway Reading 6
    • Science – he needs to pick what he wants
    • Logic Countdown
    • Homemade world geography with the Children’s Atlas of God’s World

    1st grade:

    • MCP Math Level A
    • Climbing to Good English 1
    • Pathway Reading wherever she is (probably level 2)
    • Let’s Read and Find Out science
    • Art projects

    History as a group with 8th, 6th and 1st (as much as she cares): Canadian history with My First History of Canada, some Discovering Canada books, Canada Map Book 6, literature and family history

    We also do hymn singing and Bible memory.

    nerakr
    Participant

    Like Tristan, I love these posts! Like Amanda, I have stepped away from CM in a large way. (I was never a purist). Usually I’m further along in the planning stages, but this year I’m letting having trouble in a few areas. Here’s what I have so far:

    Ds15 (grade 10)
    Bible-give him a choice of the following:
    (1) Choose a book or group of the Bible to read section by section
    (2) One of the plans from Learn the Bible for Life
    (3) A daily reading plan from Crosswalk or Bible Gateway

    English
    Finish lessons from Daily Grammar website
    Schoolhouse Spelling Upper Elementary list
    Literature: probably finish Book of Virtues for Young People (started and abandoned in gr. 8). Either read the selections together and discuss them or have him type the answers to the 5Ws for each selection. (Handwriting is his weak area)
    Handwriting practice: We abandoned the idea that his traditional printing will improve and started him on block printing a couple of months ago, when he was having trouble filling out the form for his learner’s permit. Since then he had filled out several types of forms. He will continue to do so for awhile.

    Math: undecided. He didn’t like TT Algebra 1, so we’ve spent this semester in math review and the little bit of algebra I feel comfortable teaching him. He’ll start Algebra 1 from scratch next year. Considering mathhelp.com and algebra-class.com.

    Science: probably PAC Integrated Chemistry and Physics or the chemistry half.

    History: US History. Curriculum undecided. Will include historical fiction as we go along (Johnny Tremain, Across Five Aprils, etc.)

    Computer: Our state requires a course in keyboarding, Word, Excel, and Powerpoint. He would rather take a game programming course. We’ll see.

    Drivers Ed: if he passes his permit test, dh will begin teaching him to drive.

    Dd12 (7th grade with special needs; probably works on a 5th grade reading level)
    Bible–still deciding on one of the following:
    (1) A Rachel Wojo Gospel reading plan
    (2) Primary Reading Plan from Learn the Bible for Life
    (3) Daily devotional from Keys for Kids
    (4) Monthly devotional calendar from Not Consumed

    Language Arts
    Schoolhouse Teachers Daily Grammar. Finish Level 4 and begin Level 5
    Spelling: continue a review of missed words from other plans we’ve done the last few years
    Reading/Lit–undecided. I have a booklist to work through, but I’m also considering using More Streets and Roads, an old reader that my mother used for teaching back in the ’60s.

    Math–Teaching Textbooks (she loves it)! Finish grade 5 (which we just started last month) and begin grade 6

    Science–undecided. Considering PAC Basic Science Mysteries, Exploring Creation with Sixth Grade Science from Schoolhouse Teachers, God’s Design for Science, or The How and Why Club, an old science reader from my parents’ basement.

    Geography–she wants to study world geography next year. I need something that either has tests or that I can create tests for in some way. Considering Trail Guide to World Geography (I would buy the notebooking pdf to go along with it), All about the World from Schoolhouse Teachers/Write Bonnie Rose, or the course I created for my son when he was in 7th grade using the Lands, Peoples, Cultures book series. Whichever plan we choose, I would include books with world settings (The Wheel on the School, The Incredible Journey, etc.)

    Extras: nothing scheduled. We’ll do art and handicrafts as she shows interest.

    psreitmom
    Participant

    Although we need to focus on life skills, to allow her to have some sort of diploma, plans for my soon 16yo (10th grade in fall) are as follows:

    Bible: The Narrow Way from Pearables, which includes looking up KJ Bible vocabulary in concordance and dictionary (some language arts there:)

    Math: SCM Pet Store Business Math, life skills (money, cooking, etc)

    Language:  Story Starters, Independent reading (this is weak because of dyslexia, so it will be to just build on the mechanics of reading), oral and written narrations, and helping her with word order and spelling in her written work

    History: Westward Expansion and possibly Civil War, using library books, choosing some that she can read independently; oral and written narrations

    Science: Earth science, to include weather and astronomy (using Wonders of Creation as spines, supplementing with library books, with written work and activities

    Music and art: will continue building in her gifted areas of piano and drawing

    Life skills, life skills, and more life skills 🙂

     

    Monica
    Participant

    I love these posts, too!  I’m still early in my planning, so this post will be just a rough sketch of what we have planned.  I will have 12th, 8th, and two in 5th.

    12th:

    College: he has been fortunate to be able to dual-enroll with an area college, so he will continue with that course load.  He is on pace to have 15-20 college classes done by the time he graduates in June.

    Extracurricular: piano lessons, theater, choir, and politics, all of which he has been heavily involved in this year.

     

    The younger three will participate in morning readings, during which we will cover:
    History: 1860-present using various living books
    Grammar: Fix-It Grammar level 2 (level one has been a great fit for our family this year!)
    Religion: Scripture memory and lessons with The Bible Tells Me So
    Math: drills using CalcuPak
    Literature: tentatively Stuart Little, How to Train Your Dragon, Mary Poppins, and The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, to coincide with our book club
    Poetry/Fine Arts: nothing specific planned yet

    In addition, we will do the following family/small group studies:
    Foreign Language: French Immersion class – hoping to get into this!  There are limited spots available
    Science: Marine Biology; trying to work out something with a local estuary to go in once a month for labs and hands-on research and activities.  Anyone have a suggestion for a secular curriculum for Marine Biology?

    8th:

    Math: Teaching Textbooks Algebra I
    Writing: co-op writing class
    Spelling: ?  He has struggled here.  Prepared dictation doesn’t seem like a good fit for him.
    Foreign Language: an online language class of his choice (hopefully French to complement the immersion class, or Latin, which he has previously studied)
    History: independent history readings and videos/documentaries to supplement our family studies; entries in his own timeline
    Literature: independent literature readings incorporating lots of audio books (There may a book club starting with several boys his age incorporating lots of outdoor/survival skills.  Going to keep an eye open for that!

    5th (two girls):

    Math: TBD;  I sat with them as we went through Teaching Textbooks 4 last year.  I’m not sure TT5 would be the best fit for them.
    Dictation and Copywork: selections taken from their literature reading using Bravewriter Arrow
    Written Narrations: this will be new to them this year
    Spelling: additional program (?) for the one who struggles
    Art: continue with the local homeschool class they enjoy as time and finances allow

    KeriJ
    Participant

    I do love these threads also!  I’m farther along in planning than I thought I would be though not completely done yet.  Here’s what I know so far:

    11th grade

    History: Heart of Dakota US2

    Science: Friendly Chemistry + 101 DVDs

    Algebra 2: hopefully with a local homeschool group

    French with a local homeschool group

    English: portions of EIW 11, homemade literature list, 1 or 2 Memoria Press guides, maybe Analytical Grammar review book.

    still deciding electives

    piano lessons

    9th grade

    Mapping the World with Art

    Memoria Press guide with Book of the Ancient Greeks

    CLE Algebra 1

    possibly the World Religions and Cultures study from HOD

    Science: portions of PAC Chemistry, Tiner Physics, The New Weather Book, Physics 101 DVDs

    English: Finish ULW 3, portions of EIW, homemade literature list, maybe some lessons from BJU Fundamentals of Literature

    Logic: Art of Argument, maybe

    Spanish with local homeschool group

    Piano lessons

    6th grade

    CLE Math

    Rod and Staff English

    Dictation Day by Day

    Science: undecided

    History: Famous Men of Greece with MP guide

    Literature list

    Duolingo Spanish

    Sheppards Software map drills

    Piano lessons

    4th grade

    CLE Math

    R&S English

    Dictation Day by Day

    Pentime handwriting

    Science: undecided

    Literature list

    Family studies

    Sheppards Software map drills

    Piano lessons

    2nd grade

    CLE Math

    Pentime handwriting

    Rod and Staff Spelling

    Reading list

    Family studies

    Piano lessons

    Family Studies

    Portions of SCM Ancient Greece guide, SCM Scripture memory, poetry, picture study, composers etc.

     

    amama5
    Participant

    Is the PM option gone?

    ErinD: What do you use for Intro to Rhetoric?  I’m looking for something like that to use with my son but wasn’t sure of a good resource.

     

    Tristan:  Have you used The Good and the Beautiful already ? I really like the samples, but it’s more than I usually spend just for one topic/subject so wasn’t sure it’s worth it.

    Thanks!

    ErinD
    Participant

    For Intro to Rhetoric, I’m going to have my son go through the book A Rulebook for Arguments. He’ll read and summarize the rules, then spend some time on persuasive or argumentative essays, hopefully to use some of the techniques he learns. It’s not very formal; I just sort of threw it together.

    nerakr
    Participant

    Updating my previous post.

    Ds15 (grade 10)
    Bible-We’ll either do one of the plans from Learn the Bible for Life or one of the plans from Easy Peasy Homeschool

    English
    Finish lessons from Daily Grammar website
    Schoolhouse Spelling Upper Elementary list
    Literature:
    (1) Finish Book of Virtues for Young People (started and abandoned in gr. 8). Either read the selections together and discuss them or have him type the answers to the 5Ws for each selection. (Handwriting is his weak area)
    (2) Read and analyze the Hunger Games trilogy. I got them for him over a year ago b/c he said he wanted to read them. Hasn’t picked them up.

    Handwriting practice: We abandoned the idea that his traditional printing will improve and started him on block printing a couple of months ago, when he was having trouble filling out the form for his learner’s permit. Since then he had filled out several types of forms. He will continue to do so for awhile.

    Math: undecided. He didn’t like TT Algebra 1. He’ll start Algebra 1 from scratch next year. Considering mathhelp.com and algebra-class.com.

    Science: Schoolhouse Teachers Animal Science

    History: US History. Curriculum undecided. Will include historical fiction as we go along (Johnny Tremain, Across Five Aprils, etc.)

    Computer: Word, Excel, and Powerpoint

    Drivers Ed: He flunked the permit test in April and hasn’t picked up the book since. Probably won’t happen this year.

    Dd12 (7th grade with special needs; probably works on a 5th grade reading level)
    Bible–Rachel Wojo Gospel reading plans

    Language Arts
    Schoolhouse Teachers Daily Grammar. Finish Level 4 and begin Level 5
    Spelling: continue a review of missed words from other plans we’ve done the last few years
    Reading/Lit–Will work through a list that I have, which includes the Girlhood Journeys series

    Math–Teaching Textbooks (she loves it)! Finish grade 5 and begin grade 6

    Science–When I asked her, she said she wanted to study Earth and Space Science. When I gave her a choice of resources, she chose Schoolhouse Teachers Earth and Space Science. We’ll try it, but I’m wondering if it’s too difficult for her. If it is, we’ll switch to Easy Peasy.

    Geography–she wants to study world geography next year. I showed her Trail Guide to World Geography and she said she wanted to try it. We’ll use the notebooking pdf to go along with it. If that doesn’t work for us, we’ll use All about the World from Schoolhouse Teachers/Write Bonnie Rose. Whichever plan we choose, I would include books with world settings (The Wheel on the School, The Incredible Journey, etc.)

    Extras: nothing scheduled. We’ll do art and handicrafts as she shows interest.

    HollyS
    Participant

    I have my kids paired up, except for the youngest, so I’ll list what we are doing by pairs.  We are mostly using Memoria Press and IEW.

    Family Studies:

    • SCM Scripture Memory
    • IEW’s Linguistic Development Through Poetry Memorization
    • Memoria Press 4th Grade Read Aloud (we’ll probably pull some SCM literature selections off our shelf as well)
    • Music: My goal is to work on singing hymns as well as having them learn easy versions on the piano.  We have several resources for these, including SCM’s hymns book.  I also picked up Singing Made Easy from the IEW website.
    • Shakespeare Plays (to be determined): We listen to the Arkangel CDs and everyone follows along with a Folger’s copy.  We aim for 3 plays per year.
    • SCM Laying Down the Rails for Children
    • My 5yo will be using Memoria Press K, and it includes music & art appreciation, so we can use those as a family.  I will miss our SCM artist portfolios!

    9th & 11th Grade:

    • CLE Math for my oldest (she struggles with math and this is the only program that seems to work for her), Prentice Hall Algebra for my 9th grader
    • Novare Physical Science
    • IEW Writing Intensive C
    • Fix-It Grammar
    • Literature: Henry V; Beowulf, Bronze Bow, Hobbit, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Canterbury Tales, Grammar of Poetry
    • History: Memoria Press American history and Ancient Romans/the Aeneid
    • Bible: The Story of Christianity (MP)
    • MP Traditional Logic 1 & 2
    • Second Form Latin (MP)

    7th & 4th Grade:

    • R&S Math
    • Science: MP Book of Insects, Home Science Adventures insects kit, and possibly a butterfly or ladybug kit
    • IEW Writing Intensive B
    • Fix-It Grammar
    • Copywork Cursive III (MP)
    • Spelling Workout (I actually prefer Spelling Wisdom, but they can complete SWO without my help, and I need more time with my big kids)
    • Literature: Heidi, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, Lassie, Poetry for the Grammar Stage
    • History/Geography: MP Famous Men of Rome, Geography I (MP), biographies and other American history readers
    • Bible: MP’s Christian Studies II (2nd half of Old Testament)
    • First Form Latin

    Kindergarten: Memoria Press K–I may wait to start when he turns 6 mid-year

    My art/handicraft plans aren’t set in stone, but my kids are always crafting independently, so I’m not sure how much I’ll schedule anyway.  We have Artistic Pursuits that we didn’t finish this year, so I will likely continue with it.

    I’m probably missing something!

    Tristan
    Participant

    @amama5 – Yes, we used The Good and the Beautiful Language arts (levels 4, 5, and High School 1), History 1, a few science units, and a few handwriting levels last school year. We really love it! One thing I adore about the language arts is that it takes so many lovely CM things (artist/picture study, geography/mapping, poetry/poet study, living books, copywork/grammar, etc) and rotates through it all so I don’t have to plan out what days to do the extras so much. It’s in there. Lesson 5 may have spelling/grammar/reading/mapping. Then in Lesson 6 you may find picture study/reading about the artist/copywork of a poem, and writing down some nouns from the picture you were studying. It makes it so much smoother for my large family have a feast of good, true, beautiful ideas spread before each child.

    The history is family style and rotates within lessons with: reading from the teacher book by me, activities, audio stories, read aloud, a history game, the optional crafts, and there are free student notebooks included for various grade groupings with more readings, coloring pages, notebooking opportunities, etc depending on age.

     

    Bek
    Participant

    Tristan,

    If you haven’t used the Good and the Beautiful before, would you suggest dropping back a couple of grades? Have you used it from grade 1?

    Is this the curriculum that is offered free through elementary?

    Tristan
    Participant

    @Bek – take the placement test for the Language Arts and trust the test. Yes, many are in a level that is a lower number than their ‘grade’.  Last year I had a 5th grader do LA4, and a 7th and an 8th grader do LA5. I also had my 12th grader do High School 1 Language arts because it was the only level out. It was a good foundation for each of them, into a level that was just the right amount of challenge as they got used to a totally new curriculum.

    Each level does NOT correspond to a grade level. Originally the curriculum was written with Levels 1-7, with 7 being high school and level 6 a middle school-ish level.

    Now they have begun writing High School levels (1 is out, 2 releases in August), but they are different in setup from the numbered levels. They are not laid out as daily lessons, but 10 booklets for the year. A booklet should take approx. 12-15 school days. But the student has to break down the booklet and reading assignments and writing assignments and make their own schedule.

    This year I’ll have them each move up one 6th grader doing LA 5, 8th and 9th graders doing LA6. The company does say you when your child reaches 9th grade/age 14 they can jump right into High School 1 Language Arts. However, for my 9th grader this year I know one more year of the more structured levels will be good. For 10th grade he will either choose to do level 7 or to move into the less structured High School course.

    I will also have a 5th grader doing level 3 this year – a late to reach fluency reader who will be just right with this level. Level 4 would be a bit too challenging and discouraging for this particular child.

    At the same time, this year I will have a second child doing level 3 – my 2nd grader. He hit reading fluency and will be quite comfortable with level 3.

    Remember – this is one wonderful blessing of homeschooling – we can place children in material that meets them where they are, at an appropriately challenging and appropriately supportive level, instead of overwhelming or underwhelming them.

    Also, if a child suddenly takes off, they can work through a course level faster and move into the next level during the same school year. For example, my 5th grader going into level 3 can do just one lesson per day or he can set a time goal – do LA for 25 minutes per day or 20 minutes twice per day (this would be his own personal goal, not something set by me!), and finish level 3 early, say, in February. Then we would simply grab level 4 and start it right then, and pause level 4 for our summer break and pick it right back up in his 6th grade year.

    I have also seen people who start a child halfway through a level if they feel it is the right fit.

    And another possibility, if the grammar portion is what they really need, but could do a higher level if they had passed the grammar portion, some people print the free PDF pages of just grammar concepts (level 1-5 are free to download) and do those for 4-6 weeks to master those concepts and then move into the next level doing the full course.

     

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