Topic | American Sign Language

This topic contains 14 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  swtonscrappn 3 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • csmamma
    Participant

    Hi all!

    I just love the fact that I can come here to ask questions as they come up. I don’t know what I would do without you all! Thanks a bunch.

    That said, I would like to know if any of you would consider American Sign Language as a foreign language course? My boys took a co-op sign language class last year. They loved it and learned so much. I too have enjoyed learning with them. I’m considering continuing on with this at home this fall. I’ve heard that some colleges are considering this as a foreign language. What do you all think? Do you think ASL would be a sufficient language to study? Why or why not? Have you studied it and what have you used? Any living books that you know of? Thanks for sharing any experience or insight with this.

    You are all the best!

    heather


    Sonya Shafer
    Keymaster

    I definitely consider ASL to be a foreign language. I’m teaching my third daughter and also tutored another homeschool girl all last year. The area college has several ASL classes, as well as an interpreter’s certification program. It is a bona fide language with a grammar all its own that has grown out of a distinct people group with a culture all their own.

    You’re right, though, some colleges recognize it and some don’t. So, unfortunately, that might have to be a deciding factor; but if a child is interested in ASL, let him pursue it along with another language, if needed.

    I’m afraid I don’t have a lot of good resources for studying ASL. I learned it the living way from my mom, who was an interpreter, and her deaf friends. So when I teach it, I just teach it by doing. :-) One Web site that has been very helpful is ASL Pro. They have great video dictionaries and fingerspelling practice.

    The very best way to learn ASL, as with any language, is to spend regular time with those who speak that language as their heart language. The deaf community is usually pretty tight-knit; if you can find a deaf person, he or she will most likely know other deaf in the community and any events where you could interact and practice your signing. For example, here near Atlanta there is a monthly game night for the deaf community, as well as a monthly “Silent Supper” held at the local mall. These are gathering places for the deaf, and they usually welcome ASL students too. You might Google “deaf” and your city and state and see what organizations or events you can find. Or you might check with any local churches who interpret their services and see if you can make some connections with some deaf people.

    Hope this helps!


    csmamma
    Participant

    Thank you so much, Sonya, for responding.

    How blessed you were to have your mom as an interpreter and to be apart of the culture itself – with friends and all. What a wonderful idea to check into organizations in our area. It would be great to know some who are deaf- at this point we do not but who knows maybe the Lord will open a door for us.

    Thanks again for your help. I’ll check out the ASL Pro. You are much appreciated, Sonya. :)

    Heather


    amy390
    Member

    well- it is offered at a local highschool as a 2nd language. DS is deaf but does not sign (cochlear implant) but if I ever do a 2nd language..that will be the one. there is an online resource http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/aslweb/ that has video of signs but as Sonya says, immersion is the best way.


    cherylramirez
    Participant

    My 10yo dd wants very much to learn to sign so I am going to start looking into classes or maybe something from Rainbow Resources to get us started. There are a LONG list of colleges that accept ASL as a second lanuage. I don’t remember from where I got my list, but I imagine if you google “colleges that accept ASL” you would probably come up with some.

    I am going to encourage her to learn as much ASL as she can. She can use it for several purposes: 1. Led deaf people to Christ 2. Interpret services at church 3. Start an interpretation service, (one thing I will require from both of my children is that they start and run a business before they will be “allowed” to graduate from hs) this is something she could do!


    amy390
    Member

    what great ideas cheryl!!! that whole interp thing is so important for church. there are Deaf churches but most ‘hearing’ churches – even gigantic ones- don’t have interps. I mean- how does a hearing person invite a deaf person to church. Most hearing folks who have deaf friends do sign- but not well enough to interp for their friend. Fabulous idea!


    csmamma
    Participant

    Thanks Amy and Cheryl! I didn’t think I would get much response with this. I’m so glad that there are others out there who want to do ASL and I have hope that there might be colleges who accept this.

    You are all so helpful!

    May God abundantly bless you and your families!

    Ps. Cheryl – what a great idea to have your childen start and run a business before they graduate. I might have to snag that one! 😉


    cherylramirez
    Participant

    Our country was founded on God-fearing people who were able to work with their hands support themselves. Whether or not you are a Christian IMHO it’s a good idea to know how to do “something” that you can support yourself with. It’s a simple idea, but very much out-of-style, if you know what I mean!


    suzukimom
    Participant

    I know this is an old post (I’m sure there are more recent ones… nut search found this)

    I’m looking for free ASL resources for early elementary.  We decided to add ASL now.   My kids did an ASL based toddler class years ago (and I did some babysign with each).  If you search on google, you either find Baby Sign – or stuff for adults.

     

    I can borrow some Signing Time videos for the library, and we can look up signs on various sites.  There are videos of many of our church songs on the church website……  but I don’t know what to do once they know the alphabet, numbers, colours, some foods, and animals (basically what they learned a few years ago.) 

    I’d love to find something like the “First Steps” videos…..

    any suggestions/resources?


    sheraz
    Participant

    Hey, we were just taught how to pray in ASL this in our class.  Too cool.  My oldest dd and I are loving this.  We have a deaf gentleman at church and there is a lady who interprets for him.  She is teaching us.  I will ask her what she recommends.  I also want stuff at home to reference back to.


    suzukimom
    Participant

    Well, this is what I found today doing a bit of searching…..

    This site was listed above… I linked the “functional groups”   http://www.aslpro.com/functional_groups.html

    I knew of this site before – more for adults – but has free lessons I might be able to adapt…  http://www.lifeprint.com/index.htm

    Found this site with free lessons (LOTS of ads aournd it through…) – this looks like it might work more with the kids, but is also for adults…  http://www.start-american-sign-language.com/learn-sign-language-asl.html

    This site is interesting – it is a system of writing for various signed languages.  I think this is fairly new (ie, the last 20 years or so) so it wouldn’t be used much yet…  so I have my doubts about the usefulness of learning it…  http://www.signwriting.org/about/

    And it looks like my library has this…  (American Sign Language for Kids)    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002NVY91U/ref=s9_simh_gw_p74_d0_g74_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0JTV14P6MBSPRQR8X967&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470938631&pf_rd_i=507846

     


    suzukimom
    Participant

    Well, this is what I found today doing a bit of searching…..

    This site was listed above… I linked the “functional groups”   http://www.aslpro.com/functional_groups.html

    I knew of this site before – more for adults – but has free lessons I might be able to adapt…  http://www.lifeprint.com/index.htm

    Found this site with free lessons (LOTS of ads aournd it through…) – this looks like it might work more with the kids, but is also for adults…  http://www.start-american-sign-language.com/learn-sign-language-asl.html

    This site is interesting – it is a system of writing for various signed languages.  I think this is fairly new (ie, the last 20 years or so) so it wouldn’t be used much yet…  so I have my doubts about the usefulness of learning it…  http://www.signwriting.org/about/

    And it looks like my library has this…  (American Sign Language for Kids)    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002NVY91U/ref=s9_simh_gw_p74_d0_g74_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0JTV14P6MBSPRQR8X967&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470938631&pf_rd_i=507846

     


    sheraz
    Participant

    My teacher recommended http://www.lifeprint.com/ as her favorite resource.   The lessons are free online and you can also purchase the DVD of all the lessons.  I think that I will like it, and the  DVD that has over 1,300 signs in just the first five lessons, along with reviews, games, quizzes, etc. for only $19.95 or so.  It looks interesting!  I do find myself listening for the audio.  LOL  It took me minute to realize that the words are on the screen behind them. 

    The other site I looked at was for children – and really started with baby signs.  I am not sure that I want to spend money on the childrens version – but our teacher did say that most children cannot make adult signs until five yo or so, due to small muscle control.   I do have the Baby Signs book and will use it as I can – my 4yo likes to imitate us and so we are trying to teach her some basic things too. 

    So more decisions…  I will say that whatever I end up using will need a video.  ASL needs the facial and body movements as part of the sign, and without a good example to see and follow, I am not sure that we could learn the “proper” signs.  =)


    suzukimom
    Participant

    Yup, lifeprint is one of the resource I’ve found (at various times) that looks really good.  I’ve looked at some of their lessons and am not sure I understand how to do them exactly….   I’ll have to look at it.

    I’m thinking for my kids that I’ll use the lifeprint resource (see if I can figure out how the lessons work) and also borrow the Signing Time videos often from the library so they can pick up signs in a fun way too.


    swtonscrappn
    Participant

    My children are in their third session of sign language.  The first two sessions were led by a local interpreter using the lifeprint.com site for vocab.  We learn a few lessons over a few weeks, then practice conversationally.  We have a school for the blind/deaf locally, so ASL is a completely valid choice as a foriegn language here.   

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