Topic | little years guide

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  • theblessedfullers
    Participant

    hello ladies

    I am new to the forum, but when my older children were younger, we used a guide from SCM for the little years. It was just a single sheet but if I remember correctly it laid out a week and what to do each day. I can’t seem to find it anywhere. I am now starting to question if it was from SCM. I wish I had kept a copy. Can anyone help me remember.

    Thank you & many blessings

    Katie

    Sonya Shafer
    Moderator

    Hi, Katie –

    I don’t recall an early years guide like that. So either my memory is playing tricks on me or it might have been on a different website. Sorry I can’t help more.

    theblessedfullers
    Participant

    Hi Sonya

    I appreciate your note! I am so excited, I did a pinterest search this morning and it popped up. It looks like someone took a screen shot all those years ago 🙂 here is the link…

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/81/1c/dd/811cdd13fbf2fe1ad8421a936e3b004d.jpg

    have a blessed week

    Katie

    Sonya Shafer
    Moderator

    Oh, yes, that one! So glad you found it! It doesn’t outline what to do each day of the week, but I hope it’s helpful. 🙂

    Laurie
    Participant

    Interesting as I thought the idea was to not start lessons like reading until 6, this says five.

    HollyS
    Participant

    Laurie, CM recommended age 6 for formal lessons.  Before that, you can easily do things like count things throughout their day (toys they pick up, plates as they help you set the table, birds at the bird feeder, etc.) without doing formal math lessons.  Many moms choose to do a hands-on math program for K as well.  Personally I don’t see anything wrong with it.  Our math lessons at that age take 10-15 minutes, and they’ve really enjoyed their lesson time.

    I’ve started teaching my DC letters as they showed an interest.  Two of my DC knew them at 4 and the other two were closer to age 6.  My DS was reading at age 4…I would wake up in the mornings to find his big sister teaching him letters at the dining table with a dry erase board!  🙂  While you can hold off until age 6 (or even later), I think the important thing is that your child show a readiness (and interest) for reading.  The beauty of homeschooling is that you can start reading lessons when your child is ready, and not when a teacher (or school board) decides it’s time.  In a school setting (like the CM schools), I think it is best to hold off until more children are ready for lessons.

    Sonya Shafer
    Moderator

    Yes, Charlotte didn’t do formal reading lessons until the child was six. However, she wrote about helping the children learn their ABCs and doing simple word-building as the child showed interest before that. It was all done through informal activities that seemed more like play.

    With Charlotte’s method, the formal “reading lessons” were designed to help the child move from individual word-building and word-recognition to actual reading of sentences and paragraphs and books. You can read more about it in Volume 1, pages 199–223.

    The main thing, as Holly mentioned, is to go at the child’s pace. Some will be ready and eager to learn their letters and sounds and put them together into words when they are younger than six; other children might not show an interest until later.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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