Topic | Length of time to read books?

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  • amama5
    Participant

    I’m ordering the All Day Charlotte Mason DVDs soon, so that may answer my question, but I’m just wondering the time frame in general for reading through a book?  I know the priniciple is to savor books so that the children live with the characters in their minds for a while.  So for example, if I start Module 5, are all the history and literature books to be read slowly, at the same pace and just start one after the other? 

    And also, do you ever read through some quickly?  For example, my kids are really enjoying Mr. Popper’s Penguins right now, and the chapters are pretty short.  I feel like it might be okay to have one or two books that I actually say yes to when they beg for one more chapter:) 

    Thanks so much!

    Scherger5
    Participant

    My kids are big readers and do like to devour books, however, they have to savor the ones that I schedule. To keep them happy, I have a book basket that they may read through in a day or a month :0)

    As for read-alouds, feel free to do what you want.

    Heather

    LindseyD
    Participant

    We usually read a chapter of literature and a chapter of our family read-aloud every day. Literature is often read during lunch; read-aloud right before bed. For science, we are enjoying A.S. Bailey’s Tale of … books. The chapters are so short and the stories so cute that my children often request 2-3 chapters per sitting, so we go through those pretty quickly. I don’t mind though, because that’s all we are doing for science; and I’m happy they’re so excited about them.

    Other books, however, are only read once per week, so it naturally takes quite a while to get through those. For us, that’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream currently. It causes them to really savor those books. They also read aloud to me from the Pathway series 2-3 times per week. They devour the Pathway series, so my limiting how much they read of them really makes them savor those books. They do have pre-approved library books that they can read at their leisure however much and often they want. My ds7 has been known to read an entire Boxcar Children book in 2 days, if that tells you how quickly wants he gets through those.

    The beauty of CM is that you get to decide what books you read and how slowly or quickly you want to get through them. 

    You’re going to LOVE the All-Day Seminar too!

    Blessings,

    Lindsey

     

    Lindsey –

    A couple of questions – 1. Did you purchase the A.S. Bailey books or get them some other way? They have an audio version on librivox, but the reader is British and the boys are having a hard time paying attention. I am thinking of using these also for science! Question 2. If you don’t mind my asking, for what “subject” are you reading A Midsummer Night’s Dream? I’m just curious since our children are close to the same ages, though I think y’all are a year ahead of us. And if I may inquire further, what version are you using – Lamb’s or Nesbit(I think that’s her name) or something else?

    My ds6 is really not into reading yet (he can read pretty well, just doesn’t want to). We are slowly, slowly, slowly working on this. I purchased some more audio books and that seems to be working. Right now we are listening to a selection of Just So Stories – they think the “spanking” stuff is hilarious. Of course. Anyway, sorry to hijack this thread…. I hope you don’t mind amama5! I too have wondered how long it takes to get through the books…..

    Scherger5
    Participant

    I’m not Lindsey, but there are Bailey books on Amazon.  Do you have a Kindle or the Kindle App on your computer (it’s free)?

    Heather 

    🙂 Hi Heather – no I don’t have a Kindle or the app on my computer – is the App free or the books themselves? I priced them on Amazon for paperbacks and they were around $15 or so (maybe a bit less…???) each and there are many! I don’t mind investing in books at all (within reason of course and depending on the budget at the time) and I wonder if having the paperback is a good investment – are there interesting illustrations the kids would enjoy? I looked at some free books on Gutenberg or something like that that I could read on my computer and I didn’t like it so much. Maybe I need to get used to it – I’m probably spoiled wanting the book in my own hands. Any insights?

    Scherger5
    Participant

    Well, the Kindle App for PC is free and it is here:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=ms_sbrspot_0?ie=UTF8&docId=1000426311&pf_rd_p=1279039622&pf_rd_s=center-36&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B002Y27P3M&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=088TGPQGS0XDBSZNHDR9

    At our house we have a Kindle and an Ipad (with the Kindle App) and we have grown to love reading this way.  Getting books for free or really cheap is a big motivator.  The books published by Yesterday’s Classics are all available for Kindle (and Kindle Apps) at a great price compared to paperback and they can never get bent, scuffed, or torn.  My computer is a laptop, so reading from that isn’t too bad either.

    HTH,

    Heather

    amama5
    Participant

    Thanks for the help ladies! 

    Heather, thanks for the Kindle information, I had no idea you could download things like that without the actual kindle.  I’ll just have to try and get used to reading without the actual books too:)  I downloaded a Famous Men book from Librivox and it was a pretty boring reader, I would have a hard time listening to it so maybe I’ll just do it this way, thanks again. 

    LindseyD
    Participant

    Hey Becky! Sorry I didn’t get back sooner.

    We get our ASB books from our library. They all come through inter-library loan, but I told our librarians at the beginning of the year that we wanted to read whichever titles they could get. So far, it’s been surprisingly good. We have read Benny Badger, Solomon Owl, Ferdinand Frog, Tommy Fox, and Fatty Coon. They are such wonderful stories! I don’t have a Kindle, but I do have an iPad. Unfortunately, the ASB books aren’t free on the iPad. Or, at least, I haven’t found any free ones. 

    These books aren’t illustrated much. I really think that encourages the kids to use their imaginations. And, we always go to the computer and look up images of the different animals. In one book, there can be as many as 10-15 different animals, so it’s very interesting and educational, I think.
    I highly recommend these books for science for this age (5-8 yo).

    Blessings,

    Lindsey

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