Topic | Strayer-Upton Question for Richele

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  • Erika
    Participant

    Hi Richele! I was wondering if you might please explain what “grades” each of the 3 Strayer-Upton books would be used for.

    With gratitude,

    Erika S.

    Richele
    Participant

    Hi Erika!

    So, common sense warning that this is not written in stone and will be dependent upon the child and the consistency of the parent.  This will also  be different if you get vintage copies as the new edition has combined books but if you are looking at the new editions through Rainbow Resources or CBD, Book I (red) shows as Grades 3-4, Book II (beige) as Grades 5-6, and Book III (blue) as grades 7-8.  Just to give you a real life scenario, my youngest son began the blue book in the third term of 7th grade.  My oldest son went at a slower pace but went straight from Book II into Jacobs Algebra and Geometry.  I haven’t specifically lined the Strayer-Upton up with CM’s S&S as I was using Ray’s up until about 5th grade.  I used the Scope & Sequence on pp. 46-47 in my handbook and then used the rest as a loose guide.

    I hope that helps you, Erika.  I will be in North Carolina at Grace to Build again this year if you and your husband are attending.  I believe I will be giving a 1-hour workshop on “Geometry through the Forms” with a specific beginning lesson in Practical Geometry.  My other session will be non-math.

    Warmly,

    Richele

    I’ll include this write-up I did awhile ago in case it helps anyone else reading:

    Strayer-Upton is not “Charlotte Mason” and neither are Jacobs’ texts. Neither are recommended as “CM” if taken apart from Miss Mason’s applied philosophy. The books used in PNUSchools were tools for the teacher –an arsenal of problems at her disposal– that could easily be adapted to her methods. The books were never meant to be used as is. Miss Mason’s methods were unique, from the way she introduced a number, how she taught notation; place value; and multiplication tables all the way through higher maths. Some methods you will find echo in other subjects. They all rest firmly upon her principles and the method is not contained in just a formula of short lessons, manipulatives and oral questions.

     

    Erika
    Participant

    Hi Richele! Thank you very much for your response. That is so helpful.

    We are hoping to make it to Grace to Guild again and would love to attend that session you mentioned.

    What would students use for consumer math after the 3rd Strayer Upton book in 8th grade, if that’s their pace?

    Erika
    Participant

    I also just wanted to confirm if Ray’s Primary was for 1st grade only and wondered what you recommended for 2nd grade.

    Thanks again,

    Erika

    Richele
    Participant

    Erika, Ray’s Primary or New Primary is both 1st and 2nd grade.  I’m sorry that I don’t have a recommendation for high school consumer math yet. If I settle on something I will let you know.

    I’ll look forward to seeing you and yours in the Blueridge Mountains!

    R

    Erika
    Participant

    Thanks for clarifying that for me. I really appreciate it & look forward to seeing you too!

    Patty
    Participant

    Hi Richele,

    I’m going through these posts and finding a wealth of information!  If you wouldn’t mind, could you quickly explain what using SU in a CM way should look like?  I’m just wondering if I’m doing this right.

    Thanks for all you do!

    Patty

    jill smith
    Participant

    Hi Richele,

    What math would you suggest for a 4th grader age 10? She hasnt learned her multiplication yet but is working on it this year with Saxon math. Will you be writing a curriculum like the first one for older kids?

    Blessings,

    JIll

     

     

     

     

    Richele
    Participant

    Hi Patty,

    Sure!  From the earliest lessons in Numbers to Algebra, Geometry, and advanced mathematics, each can be taught in a living way that fosters the discipline of good habits with a healthy atmosphere  -that begins with the teacher/parent.

    Some words of Charlotte’s that we can apply in general:

    “The child should be allowed to think and not compelled to cram…”

    As parents and educators it is paramount that we do not make comparisons between our children and others or hold them against an arbitrary level they (or we) are not meeting.  A child should be encouraged to progress at her own level and rate of understanding.  They should have a feeling of confidence before being required to move on.

    A child also shouldn’t have the edge taken off the intellectual interest by too great an elaboration in teaching or preparation (Vol. 1, p. 264)

    “teaching…by its guiding ideas and simple principles,…that is “true, direct, …humble, without pedantry (that’s nitpicking) and without verbiage” (wordiness) …Such teaching as enwraps a child’s mind in folds of many words that his thought is unable to penetrate, which gives him rules and definitions, and tables, in lieu of ideas (Vol. 2, p. 274)

    Now, of course we have rules, definitions, and tables, in math but they come after a child has been allowed to explore and lead to, perhaps, discover and state the rule for himself first.

    For example:  If you are teaching the reduction of improper fractions the stale way, you would go to your textbook and read “To reduce an improper fraction to a whole number or to a mixed number, divide its numerator by its denominator.” (p. 68 S/U Book 2)  Memorize the rule.  Do the problems.

    Now, on to a more life-giving method:  This comes from a sample problem on the next page:

    If you have 3 quarters in one pocket and 2 quarters in another, how much money have you in all?  Your child may be able to tell you this easily without even having money out but, if not, get some quarters out.

    Orally, this would be 3 quarters + 2 quarters = 5 quarters or 1 dollar and 1 quarter.

    Show how it is written “3/4 + 2/4 = 5/4”  From the previous math lessons and life your child knows a)  that there are 4 quarters in 1 dollar and b) that line between the numerator and denominator is another way to express division (if not, you may tell the child what that line symbolizes).

    Now, you may work another simple problem orally and then have her write it down one she has solved it.  At this point, she will most likely have realized and be able to tell you herself that she is dividing the numerator by its denominator.  And like that, she had been led into the delectable land and has discovered the rule for herself.

    Charlotte Mason’s methods are simple, yet effective.  I find the hardest part for a parent is being patient and keeping quiet.  I am certainly guilty of this and my youngest has told me, “Mom, please let me think”.

    Charlotte’s schools taught all of math using the same simple methods with different texts that were a bank of problems.  They were all quite simple texts devoid of bells and whistles. The math was able to speak for itself.

    I’ve broken the week of lessons down to contain “new, review, and mental math”.  This isn’t rigid, just helpful for remembering.  If you are introducing a new concept that day’s lesson might not contain review or, you might lead into the new concept via a review of what just went before.  While oral/mental work is an important part of math lessons throughout the grades (even in Algebra) that specific set apart time for rapid oral work that promotes so many good habits (attention, quick thinking, etc.) was carried out through 8th grade.

    I hope that helps some.  I know people have posted lots of pictures in the Charlotte Mason Math Together group of how they plan their week or month out using Strayer-Upton.

    Warmly,

    Richele

    Richele
    Participant

    Hi Jill,

    Book 2 of the CM Elementary Arithmetic Series is written and has been successfully beta-tested by some intrepid children and their moms, and is in page layout of the publishing process with SCM.  No release date has been given.  It includes multiplication tables and larger multiplication of numbers up to 1000.

    Best,

    Richele

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