Topic | Spelling Wisdom – studying ideas?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)
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  • Angelina
    Participant

    We will be starting Spelling Wisdom with DS10 this Fall. I have watched the video on studied dictation, and have read much of the good advice on this forum. One question seems to remain in my mind:

    What suggestions do you give your child for studying the passage aside from the idea of picturing a word/group of words in the mind’s eye?

    for background…We’ve done a little studied dictation in the past and I’ve found there are times when the mind’s eye suggestion doesn’t work all that well. He gets frustrated or impatient. Given that the Spelling Wisdom passages get long pretty quickly, I’m a little concerned that he’ll be giving up on the mind’s eye studying very quickly.

    So with this, do any of you suggest to your kids to write out the difficult words on a drill sheet or white board? Recite the word spelling into a recorder and play back? Any other nifty ideas?

    Benita
    Participant

    Maybe your student is more of an auditory learner as opposed to visual. What if he repeats the passage aloud to himself over and over. Or records it and plays it back?

    Angelina
    Participant

    Thanks Benita! That’s a possibility. I think he may be a bit of both.

    I guess this leads me to another question. Do most of you using Spelling Wisdom find that the child ends up memorizing the entire passage as he/she goes through the process of studying for spelling?

    sheraz
    Participant

    We use it for copywork each week. In addition to that practice, I let my children choose which words they are concerned about getting right for additional study.We practice writing them over and over, we write them and hang them on the wall in front of their place at the table higher than eye level, we make up funny little stories about the letters in the word and she decorates the letters accordingly, and we repeat them over and over out loud letter by letter (per Dianne Craft’s methodds) until my struggling speller feels that she knows them and then we test. It has greatly improved my child’s confidence…we spend about a week per excerise.

    Yes, my children end up memorizing the passage or at least recognizing it when it comes up in other places. It is a great thing to watch them make those connections.

    Angelina
    Participant

    Love the ideas of hanging up the words around their workspace, thanks! Have not ever heard of Dianne Craft methods. I will look this up, thanks….

    Benita
    Participant

    I suppose they do memorize some, yes. But isn’t that part of spelling? If we did all reading and spelling by phonetic sounding out – wow! how tedious that would be. At some point we all memorize, but the decoding is there if we need it. Does that make sense?

    Angelina
    Participant

    Makes sense, yes, thanks Benita! I think they call it automaticity. He definitely has that mastered – he is an excellent reader. But it`s just when it comes to putting pen to paper…

    Well, we`ll use the study methods as best we can and see how it goes. Thanks again ladies for your suggestions!

    Angie.

    erin.kate
    Participant

    sheraz ~ I love your suggestions. My 9yo is a terrible speller. We’ve used about 40 lessons from SW as Sonya teaches in her video. My daughter’s spelling is not improving, really at all. I know she is young and many things just take time, but I do see her self-confidence suffering since her littler sister is a natural reader and speller.

    My question is how long do you take with one passage?

    erin.kate
    Participant

    Oh, now I see you say one week per passage. How many days a week do you visit it?

    Bookworm
    Participant

    You should take as long per passage as is needed to be able to do it correctly.  Mistakes DURING dictation should be rare; most of the work should be done before.  I typically did two per week.  If you are taking longer than one per week, I’d back off down a level; the passages may be too difficult.  

    We studied a passage daily until they were ready to dictate it.  I had one child who was not naturally a visual speller.  But good spellers ARE visual spellers.  So I simply trained him to do it.  Took a little more time, of course, but this is a foundational skill.  I worked on other ways to work on visual memory, like lining up picture cards, having him study them, then taking the cards and having him put them back.  We took “snapshots” of things around us, then he closed his eyes and told me what was there.  We played that silly shower game where you put a bunch of items on a cookie sheet, let him study it, covered it up and he had to list as many as he could.  We played Concentration.  As he got better at his visual memory, we focused on the words.  What do they look like?  I often printed one up in a big font.  Having trouble with “broccoli”?  You could try to memorize the made-up rules that the phonetics folks insist exist (even though we only made them up after the spelling became standardized) and you’ll forever have trouble with which letter is doubled.  If you look at the word and think of all the rounded letters, just like the little nubs on broccoli, with only two “stems” sticking up–well, you can spell it when you are 90 in the nursing home.  “Accommodating” is another problem word.  Well, we know from Latin that it is “ad” plus “com” plus “modus”; and knowing the rules for combining words in Latin, well, of course you would make the “d” into another “c” and there are two “m’s” for “com” and “modus”.  Well, so we’ll never spell it wrong!  Once you’ve done something like this with all the problem words, ,THEN you are ready to do the dictation and the chances should be small there will be a mistake.

    missceegee
    Participant

    Bookworm Michele is one of my favorite forum friends and one that I trust explicitly except for this one subject. We simply have to agree to disagree. Wink

    At the risk of sounding anti-CM, I teach my kids to spell using phonics and spelling rules that are over 90% accurate once you’ve learned them. Personally, I don’t care when the rules came into being, only that they help us. I am an excellent speller, but I have always thought of words in phonograms or chunks of letters that make one sound. 70 phonograms and 30 rules are much easier for my brain and that of my kids to remember than thousands of words. We do use prepared dictation as part of our spelling, but break the words into phonograms using spelling rules to study. We don’t know Latin, so that doesn’t help us. 

    Just another opinion to muddy the water a bit. 

    Christie

     

    sheraz
    Participant

    @erin.kate – The length of time depends on the child. This particular one aims for one a week, but we have taken two before…I am teaching my child, not the curriculum. I have another who would try for three a week, but goes too fast and makes careless mistakes, so I hold her to 1-2 per week since we are looking for quality.

    We just started these ideas a few weeks ago with my struggling speller, and since they are helping with the SW passages, I am going to find a couple of lists of commonly used words by 1st grade or something and review them using the new ideas. It should help her “see” the words in a new light….and correct a few misspelled words. 

    I have decided that this year we need to be less family oriented in our studies to a degree…they are using each other as a crutch if I am not careful. I have been letting them work on it at the same time (doing their own passage), but have a similar situation with the feelings. Ugh – it makes me feel so out of balance, but it needs to happen.

    Bookworm
    Participant

    Laughing

    Angelina
    Participant

    No problem, muddy away, helps me to think through all the scenarios. I think we might be a bit of both (phonics and memory) in my house – thanks for the comments, I have some great ideas to work from. What a blessing this forum is! Angie

    Alicia Hart
    Participant

    We have used the website called Spelling City to study words ahead of time. You just enter the words into the program that you want your child to know and it used that list in about a dozen or more spelling games.

    This has worked very well for us. There is a free version or a paid version.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)
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