Topic | Spelling Wisdom

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • Misty
    Participant

    I just want to be sure I understand totally how to use this program before I get it.  I downloaded the free information and am just one of those who needs to say it and be told yep that’s it.Embarassed

    So let’s use the exampl: The World is so full of a number of things.  I’m sure we should all be as happy as kings.

    1.So for a day or more depending on how good of a speller I have I am to just give the child a paper that says that on it to read, study the words spelling. 2. Once the child believes they can write it correctly I would dictate the “2” sentences to the child saying 1 and then the other one (we do both of them at the same time correct?).  3.I watch as they write and if they start to print the word incorrectly I stop them and place a piece of paper over it, or could I just have them skip that word and keep going? 4. they work on any words they didn’t know and then when they think they can do it we go back to my #2. 5. Once they do this correctly 1 time they are done and move on? Or do they need to do it 2 times?

    Looking ahead even to exercies 128 from book 1 it is a bit longer.  So I would expect them to be able to write the entire thing correctly before I actually read it to them?  Then we do one sentence at a time and keep going?

    Also, I have a 4th grader who is NOT a good speller/visualizer.  Should I wait with him till 5th grade?  he will be 10 in december.  BUT I have a 2rd grader who is a good speller, should I still wait or start with him?

    Thanks for all the help, and SO very sorry for all the questions.

    misty

    CindyS
    Participant

    I’m not answering; I’m adding a question: What about the punctuation? Do I assume they will know when to put a semi-colon, period, etc.? Or start a new line in one of the poems? I’ve been giving them that info as we go and my dictation is rather stilted (plus I have little ones in the background shouting, “Period!” or “Semi-colon!”

    And Misty, I was thinking about you this morning and wanting you to update your avatar! I want to see a new picture of Fallon!

    Misty
    Participant

    OK I will try!! She’s just a little peanut!  Thanks for the added question I need to knwo that too.  Do I tell them to add a period, comma or will they know or are they supose to know?

    Jodie Apple
    Participant

    Misty,

    This is how we do it: #1 and #2 as you stated above.  #3 as you stated, but I place one of those small rectangle tab stickers you can buy in the office supply section of stores on any words that are misspelled as it is happening.  We continue until the dictation is complete. #4- Any misspelled words are written correctly on the tabs.  They then must also print any words they misspelled in the back of their notebooks in a section we title “Words to Study”.    We don’t dictate passages over again just because they’ve misspelled words in them.  We move on to the next passage.  When there are 10 or so words on this list, we review any phonics rules that might help them remember the words better and they study these for a ‘test’.

    As for the longer passages, they will have gradually worked up to that point.  I don’t feel pressured at all to complete every Spelling Wisdom book available.  We work at a pace that is gentle and comfortable for each child.  In fact we started our 11 year old with Book 1 last year and we’re still not even half way through the book.  If we get through all the books by the time he graduates, great. If not, it’s ok.  We may even decide to start a different type of dictation work, like the suggested Book of Mottos.

    I would make the choice to start this program based on their ability to read and write confidently instead of their ability to spell. 

    HTH some,

    mj

    Jodie Apple
    Participant

    I just tell them when we come to a new line in a poem if they need help with that.  Right now the only things I hold them responsible for gramatically are the things they’ve learned.  For example, my 11 year old should know to start the sentence with a capital letter and end in the proper punctuation (. ! or ?)  The rest will come in time.  We also talk about where a comma might be based on the pauses he hears in the dictation.  We are currently doing Junior Analytical Grammar too, and we haven’t covered those other types of punctuation.  When we do, I suspect he’ll be able to transfer that knowledge to his dictations.   After he is finished writing the dictation, I read the entire passage back to him so he can look over what he’s written and at that point we insert any punctuation marks he’s neglected to insert.

     

    csmamma
    Participant

     Oops, meant to respond to your other Spelling post.

    Sonya Shafer
    Moderator

    Here are a few little extra tips on the steps you outlined above.

      1. Show the child the exercise and say something like, “Are there any words on this page that you’re not sure you know how to spell?” Then help them go through the words and identify which ones they need to focus on studying. Ideally, there would be no more than about three words they don’t know how to spell. If they’re finding lots, then you need to back off to an easier exercise or wait on dictation. Once they’re studied the words, encourage them to look at the capitalization and punctuation too. It shouldn’t be a huge ordeal, especially if they just studied three or fewer words.
      2. If you want to, before you dictate the passage you can do a little “pre-test” (but don’t call it that). You might want to spot check those three words you identified and he studied. Just say something like, “OK, you’re sure you know how to spell ___? Let’s make sure.” And have him write or orally tell you how to spell them. That way you give him a safety net that will set him up for success in the dictation exercise and cut down on misspellings. Also, when you dictate the exercise give only enough words at one time that he can remember and write with no repeats. Each child will be different, and the length of the phrases will change as he becomes more adept. I guess the main thing to remember with this step is that dictation is not a memory feat and is not a race.
      3. It’s hard to remember what’s coming up next when you’re interrupted. So i try not to interrupt the child and make him stop writing if I see a misspelled word. The little post-it notes come in very handy to quietly cover up the word and just keep going. Hopefully, if you do the little “pre-test” before the dictation time, you will use very few post-it notes.

      Just remember that the goal of dictation in CM is to prepare the passage well enough ahead of time that misspellings in the dictation lesson will be the exception, rather than the rule. So take as much time as your child needs to prepare and study the passage. You’re building habits that will benefit him in the future.

      Oh, almost forgot. RE punctuation (Charlotte called it “pointing”): 

      “Then the teacher gives out the dictation, clause by clause, each clause repeated once. She dictates with a view to the pointing, which the children are expected to put in as they write; but they must not be told ‘comma,’ ‘semicolon,’ etc.” (Vol. 1, p. 242).

      So we use our voices to give clues as to the punctuation, but try not to interrupt the flow of the passage with those directives. I agree with mj that we don’t need to get too stressed about it with younger children. This is a process and they will improve as we go along and as they see certain punctuations used consistently. I especially don’t get hung up on some of those obscure punctuation situations, like poetry. Are there any rules for punctuation in poetry? If so, I haven’t figured them out!

      Misty
      Participant

      Thanks to everyones reply I will be taking it all in and starting soon.

      One thing I didn’t hear is about my boys and if I should start them or not. 5th grader is a go, what about my not good speller 4th grader, but really good speller 2nd/3rd grader?  The last 2 would love to hear they don’t have to do spelling anymore!!

      Misty

      Misty
      Participant

      Looking over my latest purchase made me come up with a few more ?’s.

      Do they also write the title and author?  And Soyna, you never said if they don’t get all the words write if they keep reviewing and do it again next time? (Though I do like the idea of one above about keeping those words in a seperate area and then doing like a “test per say” with those)

      Thanks everyone I think I’m going to like this spelling/copywork/dication (boy this will help our schedule alot) Misty

      Sonya Shafer
      Moderator

      Some moms include the title and author; some don’t. That’s up to you.

      I don’t recall Charlotte explaining anything more beyond studying the word again and writing it correctly on the post-it note:

      “At the end of the lesson, the child should again study the wrong word in his book until he says he is sure of, and should write it correctly on the stamp-paper” (Vol. 1, p. 242).

      So feel free to do what works for you. 

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