Topic | Module 2: two questions

This topic contains 17 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  simple home 3 years, 7 months ago.

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  • LindseyD
    Participant

    I have two questions regarding the geography in Module 2.

    1. Why are we labeling maps of Asia instead of Ancient Greece, when it’s Ancient Greece we’re studying? Would it be possible to add in map study of Ancient Greece for ds7? I don’t mind doing map drill of Asia, but I don’t see WHY when looking through the lessons. I guess I’m wanting everything to coordinate?
    2. Can anyone suggest a replacement for Voskamp’s A Child’s Geography of the Holy Land? We are not enjoying this book, thus not using this book. I like the idea of reading about Iraq while reading about King Nebuchadnezzar, but none of us has been interested in this book so far and we stopped using it several weeks ago. I want to go more in-depth with geography reading, but I need to replace this resource.

    Any help is appreciated!

    Blessings,

    Lindsey


    houseofchaos
    Participant

    missceegee
    Participant

    Lindsey,

    We use map drill to focus on current locations. I don’t worry about learning ancient ones. We look at them, but if we ever need to know, we can look them up. We tend to focus on one continent at a time, learning mainly the countries, but some other info on occassion, too. We use the SCM recommendations and they tie in mostly, but it makes sure that we cover all of the continents and areas. 

    Christie


    LindseyD
    Participant

    @houseofchaos, Could you tell me specifically how you’re using this book with Module 2? Do you feel it’s enough for learning the geography and culture of the places in Module 2?

    @Christie, That makes sense to me. Why learn Ancient Greece when it’s totally different now? I see where you’re coming from. So, in Module 2, now that we’ve already become proficient in labeling the Middle East, where do you suggest we go next? Learn the locations of towns, mountains, and rivers in modern-day Greece? Learn another continent altogether?

    I’m really wanting to get confident in this, but I’m not there yet. I don’t know enough about living geography books to feel confident enough to supplement without the advice of someone more knowledgable than I.

    Blessings,

    Lindsey


    LindseyD
    Participant

    Just wanted to bump this up!


    houseofchaos
    Participant

    Hi Lindsey,

    The book definitely does not compare to Explore the Holy Land for actual information, but it is a fun read for and tells about some interesting places (Masada, wailing wall, golden gate, etc.).  It only covers a quick tourist’s eye view, but does discuss enough history and geography that I am happy with it for our younger crew.  I suppose it really depends how much you would like to cover and what ages your children are.

    We also use the Seterra geography game for regular map drill, and print out maps to label about once a month:

    http://www.seterra.net/

    It’s a good game, with flags, countries, capitals and cities.

    Gaeleen


    Rebekahy
    Participant

    Seterra looks cool… why is it free?  Am I just paranoid?

     


    LindseyD
    Participant

    Sorry to bump this again…I’m just hoping there are some other suggestions for my question. I really am at a loss of what to do, and I’d really like some more options to look over before I decide what to do. 

    Thanks!

    Lindsey


    simple home
    Member

    Lindsey, I too don’t care for the book although I do refer to it some for insight. When teaching my kids geography, I try to look at the broader picture and do the basics of knowing the maps and names of general places that come up in our studies. I also try to take note of anything in particular that is interesting to the area’s topography or scenery. I don’t want to overload with too many facts, but just try to provide some hooks to hang on for remembering their studied places.

    Another thing I do is to find some recent news or get online and find a few things to show about the area and its people. This is a good opportunity for praying for different parts of the world.

    I don’t know if there is a lot of good geography reading books out there, and that is why I’m doing my own thing. I do have the books Window to the World, and I just ordered Material World yesterday for added supplement. Hopefully between these resources I’m giving my children a good idea of the places we’re studying.


    LindseyD
    Participant

    I **think** I’m looking for a recommendation for a book that is similiar to Voskamp’s book, but with a lot less bulk. The passages are so lengthy, and we don’t really care for the style of her writing. (I was really excited about this book in the beginning because I am a faithful reader of Voskamp’s blog and assumed her books would be the same. Wrong.) It also seems like there are a lot of somewhat interesting, but mostly useless, facts and bits of information. I am looking for a living book, even a story about the Middle East, that I can read to my children on our geography days. I don’t want just a dry map study, and I am not familiar enough with the Middle East to tell them bits of information they might find interesting. Also, now that we’re not really studying the Middle East anymore, I would like to find books of interest on Greece (other than those recommended by SCM; we already have those), Turkey and Iraq. I just don’t think my children are making the connection with our readings and the part of the world we’re studying. I’m not trying to force false connection, but I feel it’s necessary in this case.

    Now I’ve probably confused you all more than anything!

    Blessings,

    Lindsey


    simple home
    Member

    One book we enjoyed that is set in the Middle East is Joel, Boy of Galilee. It doesn’t go into a great deal of geography detail, but it does mention certain places and could give you a springboard to jump from as you talk of this area on the map. It is written from a boy’s point of view during Jesus’ s time.( I realize this is New Testament but the places haven’t changed since the Old Testament of course :)

    That’s the only “living book” that we’ve done in this time period so far. I believe the Bronze Bow is another one in this area, but I believe it’s for older kids?? Have u checked other resources like Veritaspress or Beautiful Feet?


    simple home
    Member

    I forgot to mention that Ancient Greece is probably a tricky time period for Christians to find living books about. I’ve seen a few of these children’s books and most are written from a secular view concerning the gods and mythology. That is why I haven’t done much of these books. If you happen to find a gem though, please share! :)


    missceegee
    Participant

    Lindsey,

    You may want to check some of Tapestry of Grace’s resources for Year 2. I’ve no idea what’s included, but it’s worth a check. Also look in Christine Miller’s All through the Ages. Try some travel videos, too, to give a real flavor of the place. Oh, you might try Yesterday’s Classics, too.

    I’ve just piced up a copy of Richard Halliburton’s Complete Book of Marvels that looks promising for Geography in general. 

    Hope that helps,

    Christie


    LindseyD
    Participant

    Christie,

    With regard to my questions, would you start our next map drill with a close-up of moder-day Greece, learning cities, mountains, rivers, and such? Or would you do a continental study of Asia, learning countries? Or something else?

    I will check out these other suggestions and see if I can find something I can use!

    Lindsey


    missceegee
    Participant

    Lindsey, I would personally move on to a continental study of Asia. I will be thrilled if my kids learn the countries! I don’t worry too much about the “inner details”, but they seem to pick up on them through our continental studies. That’s just me, though. Smile

    Christie

     

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