Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • connollyhomeschool
    Participant

    My DD would like to add more living books to her science this year to model more closely to the approach we’re doing with my younger ones with birds. She is already reading the recommended books from this site (Along Came Galileo, The Fossil Book, Galen, etc.), but I was wondering if there are any other recommendations either in approach or titles? By approach, I’m wondering whether I should add more specific titles to the general science list for her or simply let her loose with any living science book she is interested in since 1) she is already reading the general science list as a mandatory list this year and 2) general science broadly covers a variety of sciences anyway.

    The only trick is that I have to purchase these books as the library on this island has not proven to be a good resource (the children’s library, which is separate from the actual regular library is simply one room, if that gives you an idea of the lack of resources available, and you can only check out three books a week). So knowing specific titles, authors, and/or series to grab would be a great help. As I can’t preview books myself from a library, having your experience and preview is an invaluable resource for me!

    If it helps to know what I do have, I’m waiting to receive the science-related books from Yesterday’s Classics, and I also have loads of Landmark and Trailblazer books.

    HollyS
    Participant

    Have you looked at the Living Books Library blog?  There are lots of great nature books listed there!  Since most are older books, you can usually find them on Amazon or another used book site fairly inexpensively.

    Over the summer I just picked 5 books that I’d like us to read during the year.  We were already planning reading the Burgess Bird Book and Blacky the Crow to go with the Learning About Birds guide.  For other books, I looked on our bookshelves and through the Yesterday’s Classics books.  I did order one that I read about on the Living Books site.

    I did want to focus our nature studies on birds, trees, and the night sky.  However, a couple of the books I picked were on other topics. We’ll be reading:

    • Chipmunks on the Doorstep (a vintage science book)
    • Woods Walk (newer book)
    • Trees and Shrubs (yesterday’s classics)
    • The Sandman: His Ship Stories (yesterday’s classics)
    • Bird Watchers and Bird Feeders (vintage science book)
    • 365 Starry Nights (this is more of a reference book that one we’ll be reading aloud)

    I planned out our readings so they are fairly short.  Even only reading 5 or so pages at a time (2 days per week), we’ll easily be able to get through these books.  That leaves us 2 days for the bird study and one day for a nature lesson (using the Handbook of Nature Study as a guide).

    RobinP
    Participant

    Nicole has many books listed.

    http://www.sabbath-mood-homeschool.com

    connollyhomeschool
    Participant

    Thank you HollyS and RobinP!

    For 7th grade, should I just let her select any of these that she is interested in, or should I schedule them for her (she is already reading through the list from this site for general science, and she is sitting in on our learning about birds sessions)? Perhaps my real question all along should have been what book should she not miss reading in 7th grade general science?

    I always find myself in a continual conundrum of not wanting to push too much onto them, yet I don’t want them to miss out on a gem of a book. 🙂

    Wings2fly
    Participant

    There are more books in the series that includes The Fossil Book.  My 11 ds liked that book and will also be reading The Mineral Book and The Ecology Book this year.  You could also add some biographies of scientists of interest.

    It seems she has a lot of science scheduled already.  I would just encourage reading what interests her in her free time or a scheduled reading time.  My son seems to prefer science or history nonfiction over literature for his free reading.  I think the SCM living science books you already scheduled are the “not to miss” books.

    connollyhomeschool
    Participant

    Thanks wings2fly–that info is very helpful. While it isn’t always this way, it’s certainly easier to know of a series with which you can do a mass grab. I was just on AiG and flipped over to Masterbooks to see what else I can find. Thanks!

    Wings2fly
    Participant

    If you are interested in purchasing very many Master Books, check pricing wholesale at libraryanded.com

    The Backyard Birds dvd would be nice for your studies if budget allows it.

    connollyhomeschool
    Participant

    Wow–where has this been all my life?! I need to begin history, but I quickly signed up for my account and can see myself doing some shopping today. Thanks so much!

    I’ll check out that DVD, too. Thanks again!

    HollyS
    Participant

    If she’s reading them on her own, I’m not sure I’d bother assigning them.    My DC most likely won’t pick up a non-fiction book if it isn’t assigned, so that’s why I schedule them out.

    I also agree that the books you’ve picked out are great choices.  My DC really enjoyed the Jeanne Bendick book we read over the summer.

    connollyhomeschool
    Participant

    Thanks, HollyS for your input and help!

    Salina Fedrick
    Participant

    I’m in the same boat. My son is starting Exploring Creation With General Science by Apologia and I’m wondering with the CM method, should I just read through the book with him and do some of the experiments and skip the test solutions etc…And also where on this site are the suggested living books for general science. I’m still trying to find my way around the site. Thanks. 🙂

    connollyhomeschool
    Participant

    simplemom–here is the approach I’m taking (and why).

    I purchased the textbook, notebook, and test/solutions. I read ahead of my daughter myself (it’s not much reading at all so this does not take up a lot of time/prep), and she does the daily reading and the notebook writing. I have her narrate orally most days what she has read, which is why I read ahead of her. There are many experiments, and so far, they are very well done (aside from one) and not overly complicated so as to drown out the point. She does all of the experiments.

    I have her follow the schedule laid out in the front of the student notebook, which includes prep time for the test and a day to take the test. She does take the test, but I don’t have her do the fill-in-the-blank summaries that are optional before the test. I don’t find fill-in-the-blank summaries to be a useful tool for anything.

    Now for the why . . .

    Experiments: I wouldn’t skip any experiments (except the charting one maybe–the instructions aren’t too great) as those are the hands-on way to learn and solidify the concept. I like that they read up to the experiment instructions, do the experiment, record results (again the experiment pages are laid out in the notebook so it’s nice and tidy), discuss findings with you, and then they read on to see what the book says about it. Done properly, they really do discover ideas on their own. My daughter really enjoys this part, and she often asks her siblings to join or they ask to join her.

    Student notebook: This has everything laid out from the schedule, to summaries, thought-provoking questions, and even lab sheets. The notebook portion (post-reading) often asks them to summarize what they’ve read in a few sentences, compare something, or some kind of exercise that shows real understanding of what they read. It is not Q&A.

    Tests: The test-prep portion (in notebook as well) is writing out definitions, Q&A, etc. I have her do this and take the test with a closed book. I don’t do this b/c I think kids need to “learn to take tests”; instead, what is more important IMO is developing an understanding in each of my individual children of how they need to read/write/etc. to learn a subject. I’ve stressed to my DD that if she is prepared and has absorbed and understood a topic, then she’ll do well on a test. Preparation and understanding is the key. So, she is in the process of discovering whether she is reading too fast, reading/not reading carefully enough, whether she should make one-sentence summaries or notes as she reads/after she reads, whether she should write out definitions, etc. I can help her discover this through narrating, but the long-term absorption is interesting to see on the test. So far she has made some discoveries and changed a few things beyond what I require her to do.

    I’m not recording her grades as I still think this is not a time for mastery of these concepts but deeper exploration and discovery than in her primary years. I don’t treat the test-prep or test day as any different than any other day’s work. We don’t make the test a big deal. However, she is beginning to see the difference between how she is learning to learn compared to her peers in school, cramming for tests or studying the night before. She is noting that even if it’s a subject she doesn’t care for, it’s much easier to truly understand and learn pieces of it each day than take copious notes that you memorize later. I am glad for that.

    In addition, she is reading the recommended general science books and some others recommended in this link. She enjoys that part immensely, but she really likes the independence of this science course and showing her siblings or her dad what she learned.

    I’d say she spends about 20 to 30 minutes on it per day, depending on if there is an experiment or not.

    Every family is different, and everyone has great methods and ideas. I’m just sharing one of several that works for our one child 🙂 I hope you find a good fit for your son!

    connollyhomeschool
    Participant

    Oh, and here’s the link to the books from this site: https://simplycharlottemason.com/planning/curriculum-guide/individual-graded-subjects/living-science-books/

    If it doesn’t work or you don’t want to scroll through this post to find the link again when you need it, just go to the planning portion of this site–>the free curriculum guide–>individual subjects (science)–>and click the link to the living science books.

    Salina Fedrick
    Participant

    Thanks connollyhomeschool for your help. Are the books to be read along with the curriculum or just serperately?

    Karen Smith
    Moderator

    The living science books on the curriculum guide are suggestions of books suitable for each grade. They were not chosen to go with any particular curriculum.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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