Topic | Lightning Lit questions

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This topic contains 14 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  jeaninpa 3 years, 2 months ago.

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  • jeaninpa
    Participant

    I have been reading the thread on high school literature with interest.  Lightning Lit looks lovely — sorry, couldn’t resist the alliteration!  If you’ve used it, what resources do you recommend purchasing for it?  Student guide and student workbook?  How necessary are the teacher’s guides (I tend not to look at them Embarassed )  If my sixth grader has already read all the books listed for the 7th grade course, should I go ahead with that one anyway and have him re-read them or should I try to use a course where the books would be new to him?  Thanks,

    Jean


    Bookworm
    Participant

    I didn’t even know there was a teacher guide, so.  I’ve never used it.  I also have not used the two middle school courses.  I would discuss with your child whether he would mind re-reading them.  If not, it’d be OK, but some might find it a bit boring and oh, there are so many books to get to, to spend a whole year doing ones you’ve already read!  LOL


    jeaninpa
    Participant

    Thanks, I’m looking forward to trying it.

     


    Sue in MN
    Member

    For the 7th and 8th grade LL you need the Teacher Guide. They don’t have a Teacher Guide for the high school versions. Have you looked at the website to see if he has learned all the English elements and writing information that is taught in the 7th grade workbook? I thought that the 7th grade work was very foundational to all the rest of the courses in the older years. I wouldn’t have wanted my daughter to miss it. In fact I even just today in my college English class used things that I learned from teaching that course five years ago.


    jeaninpa
    Participant

    Sue,

    Thanks for that information.  I’ll look it over more closely.

    Jean

     


    momto2blessings
    Participant

    O.k., all this LL talk has gotten me interested.  Are any of you familar with both LL and Teaching the Classics?  I’ve been planning on buying TTC, but am really liking the look of LL and don’t want to overdo it.  Thanks for any tips!  :)Gina


    tfigueroa
    Member

    I have been looking at LL and I have another question. Would you have a 9th grade student just starting will LL take the 7th grade class just to make sure you get that foundation, or is jumping right into the High School courses okay? If you go right to the High School courses where should you start. We will be doing module 5 next year, but dd likes Acient Egypt.


    Bookworm
    Participant

    I wouldn’t start with the 7th grade.  I never used the 7th or 8th grades and don’t plan to.  The site recommends beginning with one of the American Literature guides for a first time user or a 9th grader, and what I’ve seen of them supports that.  There really isn’t an ancients LL guide.  Janice Campbell’s more classically-based Excellence in Literature (have not used this myself) has a module covering ancients but only back to Greeks, and it’s the fifth and most challenging-looking of the programs.  Not a lot of uplifting Egyptian lit I’m afraid. 


    greenebalts
    Participant

    momto2blessings…..We will be using LL this year with 11th grader.  I bought Teaching the Classics last year, but have not implemented it.  LL is more of a open and go program that’s written to the student.  TtC is more of a guide for the parents to help their children get the most out of classic literature.  It requires more teacher time and prep.  As I mentioned, I own it and it looks great, but I haven’t had time to implement it.  

     

    HTH,

    Melissa

    http://reflectionsfromdrywoodcreek.blogspot.com/


    momto2blessings
    Participant

    Thanks, Melissa.  Did you listen to TtC?  I’ve heard it’s helpful for early years on (my kids are 9 and 12).  But I prefer open and go and LL looks great.  Are they basically covering the same things….just different formats?  Do you see any advantage in starting earlier with something like TtC?  I don’t want another thing on my plate if I don’t need to.  Hope that was clear!  Thanks for the input:) Gina


    momto2blessings
    Participant

    P.S. I enjoyed reading some of your blog posts, Melissa!


    suzukimom
    Participant

    That’s wierd – my post seemed to go to the wrong thread!


    greenebalts
    Participant

    Good Morning momto2blessings, thanks for the compliment on our blog :)

     

    I have not listened to TtC.  However, I just grabbed the book off the shelf and read this….

     

    “You will find that the seminar is divided into six lessons.  Each session focuses on one area of literacy analysis.  The first session gives an overview for why we should study literature and examines literary style using Longfellow’s poem, Paul Revere’s Ride.  The second session examines plot and conflict using Beatrix Potter’s Peter Rabbit while the third session explores setting using Kipling’s Rikki Tikki Tavi.  Character and Theme are presented using an excerpt from Twain’s Tom Saywer and Tolstory’s Martin the Cobbler, respectively.  To sum up the seminar, Adam gives teachers the opportunity to teach the famous poem Casey at the Bat.  The lectures are dynamic and engaging, so your students may enjoy watching the seminar with you.”

     

    “After you watch the seminar, you can practice what you have learned on any other piece of literature.  The principles apply to picture books, historical readers, biographies, classics, poetry, movies and plays – anything, in fact, that tells a story.  If you need some suggestions, the syllabus provides graded book lists for students of all ages.”

     

    That gives an overview of each recorded session.  TtC can be used with students of all ages as it is a method of teaching.  Where as, LL is a currciula so to speak for Jr/Sr High students.  Yes, they use some of the same books, however, once you learn the TtC socratic method, you can use it with any book.  

     

    Blessings,

    Melissa

    http://reflectionsfromdrywoodcreek.blogspot.com/


    Evergreen
    Member

    We used Lightning Lit 8 for my 7th grader last year, and he liked it so well that he asked to use more LL for LA this year. We never used the LL 7 program – someone had loaned it to me, and it looked a bit easy for this particular student, and he had read most of the books already, so we went straight to 8 with no difficulty. The teacher’s guide was necessary, but we skipped a lot of the busywork in the student book. My son loved the writing exercises and background information in the student pages. I think it was a very worthwhile course and loved watching the development of his writing skills through the year. I plan on using it with my other boys when they’re old enough.

    This year he’s using one of the LL high school packs, and they’re MUCH different – walks you through much less, no busywork. They’re appropriate for him now, but I’m glad he got to enjoy LL8 last year. If your son is young for the LL8 guide, perhaps you could choose something else for the coming year, and then use LL8 for 7th or 8th grade? My son loved Intermediate Language Lessons in conjunction with lots of good books to read as his LA program from 4-6.


    jeaninpa
    Participant

    We just began LL 7, with a sixth and seventh grader.  So far I think it will be good for both of them.  One thing to note is that it only has 21 weeks scheduled.  I think that if you wanted to you could do some skipping and cover both 7th and 8th levels in one year just hitting the aspects that you think would benefit your student.  

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