Topic | high school science, that's not apologia?

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 60 total)
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  • TailorMade
    Participant

    This is a very nice book to add to Biology 101 for lab credit.

    http://simplycharlottemason.com/scmforum/topic/dissection-projects#post-129283

    retrofam
    Participant

    We use ACE’s biology, etc. courses for highschool. I have used the lab DVDs and lab reports (contained in the PACES) as the state required lab component, and then used a different curriculum for the spine also.

    Currently my dd is using the paces and labs and instead of the worksheets, tests, etc. she narrates and writes a report for the test.

    With the DVDs, you could get specimens and dissect along with the DVD instructor if desired. I like ACE because it is less expensive than many and has DVD labs. My son didn’t do well in Apologia, so we went this route.

    Hth,

    C

    jotawatt
    Participant

    Great idea, retrofam.  I’ve been very interested in this thread because my children, too, have had difficulties with Apologia’s high school courses.  How do your children like the paces?  Do they find them difficult to understand/follow?

    nwilliams551
    Participant

    I have written a few things on my blog about doing science in a Charlotte Mason way, including a Chemistry curriculum that I used with my big kids and just started using for my newest high schooler.

    Most recently I wrote a post called Science – The Last Hold out (http://www.sabbath-mood-homeschool.com/2013/10/science-last-hold-out.html) which might be interesting to some of you. it’s not so much a “how it’s done” but a “why we should” post.  

    I am working through high school science with my second set of kids and trying to share as much as I can as I learn.

    Bookworm
    Participant

    One thing to remember—doing science in a “Charlotte Mason way” does NOT preclude using textbooks in the upper years.  And using texts needn’t ruin anyone’s love of anything, not at this age.  By the upper high school years, a student ought to be able to HIMSELF find delight in learning anything, in any way.  After all, the real world coming at him shortly isn’t going to be all nature notebooks and family read-alouds.  Joy can be found, and learning can be found, indeed MUST be found if adult happiness is to exist at all—in manual labor, in repetitive tasks, in uninspiring texts, in inordinately long labs, in interminable business meetings, in an ice storm feeding the cattle, in lectures delivered in monotones—  In fact, IMO, the “real” Charlotte Mason way must include this very teaching and experience.  Not, perhaps, at age 7, but certainly by 17, a child should know intimately that all books are not exciting, that all learning is not painless, that all tasks are not fun, but that deep satisfaction is found in the worthy performing, regardless of its “fun” level.  How to extract the value from a text that may not be what you’d have chosen for your relaxation reading?  That is a question very profitably addressed in the high school years.  How to enjoy it anyway?  When one can do this, one is truly educated in the “Charlotte Mason way.”  How, exactly, would Charlotte approach, say, physics, if she were teaching in our day?  I am quite certain that, in the upper years, she would not be seeking an easy way out, or trying to make the topic palatable–it is already interesting, AND difficult, and I think she would have embraced that and not shied away from it, and by her example taught that difficulty and effort are NOT the opposite of happiness and joy.  They are, instead, its essence.  

    Just a thought from a mom who is working on graduating college science major #2, with #3 entering high school years soon.  

     

    jotawatt
    Participant

    Nwilliams551, thank you for that link.  I love the look of your chemistry program.  I, too, have special needs children and so often have to tweak things or do something entirely different. 

    I appreciate your perspective and your experience, Bookworm.  I don’t have a problem with textbooks that are well-written.  I’m sure Apologia falls into that category, and my son didn’t do too badly with the biology.  For my daughter (like her brother, very intelligent but also spectrum), it was something she would slog through and not understand, and it too often ended with sobbing (from a girl that is otherwise very stoic).  “Hate” is not strong enough a word for how she felt about it.  There are plenty of other things she has to do which she doesn’t enjoy, and we’re trying to teach them all that “in all labor there is profit,” and anything worthwhile in this life is worth working for.  We decided that, in this case, it was not worth pushing a particular textbook when there are so many other possible ways to cover the subject. 

    Tara

    RobinP
    Participant

    I specifically emailed my friend, Nicole (nwilliams551) this morning and asked her to share her perspective. She has been reading and researching for many years on how to teach science based on what we know of how Charlotte taught it in the high school years. Looking at her Programmes and schedules was very helpful. Since Charlotte has been gone for 90 years we really don’t know what she would have done with the world we have created. We do know by her writings she espoused books with literary power at all ages. Reading and studying these types of books in no way equals light or an easy way out. Many of the families in my library are benefitting from Nicole’s work in the form of a high school curriculum for science, not only those who are less science oriented but some who plan to make science a career. I hope when her curriculum is complete she will be able to share it with those who may be looking for another option.

    TailorMade
    Participant

    I look forward to hearing of your friend’s suggestions. They will certainly be welcome in our home. We’ve enjoyed reading/studying books in specific science fields written be experts in those fields. There seems to be immediate application. It tends to spark more research.

    Shanna
    Participant

    We also do not like Apologia, and to be even more honest I don’t see a need for every student to have 3 or 4 years worth of high school math. My kids know full well how to dissect and what the anatomy of many animals look like just from hunting or finding dead animals and dissceting them. Yes, my kids are weird! Yet, they have learned so much. We seriously believe that once the high school years hit that the student needs to be focused on what their interests and career focuses are. We also don’t feel that college is our first option for further education. We believe in finding and providing resources for our kids to learn the skills they need and working in those areas before they are ever ready to graduate. Yes, there are times that college is needed, but we really believe those times are few and far between. Our oldest is 18 and working for a major ministry organization in their Information Technology department. I know this seems like a huge rabbit trail, but we need to remember not to put our children in boxes and thinking they need certain subjects just because some government official or person online says they do.

    crazy4boys
    Participant

    RobinP, sounds like a fascinating science study.  I’m sure there are many people interested!

    cherylramirez
    Participant

    @Shanna: I pm’d you.

    TailorMade
    Participant

    @ Shanna, Kindred spirits. ;0)

    retrofam
    Participant

    Jotawat,

    I wouldn’t say my kids love the Paces, but the content is understandable. When they were using the worksheets(activity packs) it was getting boring because of the repeating of information and typical schoolish curriculum. When they switched to narration and reports instead, it was much better. I like that it is Christian and has labs.

    The math parts of it may be difficult for some, but we studied the process of those problems and didn’t dwell on their ability to solve each problem them self. I had several teens close in age, so we did group labs just like when I was in school. This cut costs too.

    C

    TailorMade
    Participant

    Nicole, I finally had time to read your blog post this afternoon. Thank you for sharing it. I appreciate your words and encouraging insight.

    thowell
    Participant

    I am thinking of using this. http://guesthollow.com/homeschool/science/biology/biology_home.html

    The text looks awesome! She has made it Christian friendly, it includes short videos and demo clips and it is free! She has also added a ton to go along with it that makes the course look even better! She also has a really good High School Human Anatomy course to follow up with.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 60 total)
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