Topic | Hebrew and/or Jewish studies

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
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  • ima2
    Member

    Hello ladies,

    I am wanting to start teaching both my 4 year old daughter and myself Hebrew. I was wondering if any of you have taught Hebrew to your children or yourselves and if you have any recommendations for resources? I would also be interested in resources for teaching Jewish religious education at home too!

    Thanks so much for your help!

    Rachel

    Rachel White
    Participant

    Shalom Rachel,

    I’m not at home currently, but I have some ideas for you. First, are you interested in Modern Hebrew or Biblical Hebrew? To be honest, there aren’t any real Biblical Hebrew sources for the younger age group. However, there is for Modern Hebrew and it’s easy to transition into Modern when they get to their upper middle and high school years. There’s adult Biblical Hebrew, as well as Modern. I find I’ve been learning right along with my children in their modern hebrew studies, but I’ve also used some adult materials; our children have been learning mod. Heb. since age six; they are now 10 and 11. Since I want them to easily function in Israeli society, mod. Heb. is just as important to us as Biblical. They have also been exposed to Heb. prayers and liturgy all their lives and have just begun their Bar/BAt Mitzvah classes this year. Heb. music has also been an important vehicle for not only praising HaShem but also learning the language, too.

    Are you members of a synagogue (shul)?

    As for Jewish ed., may I ask at what level of observation you would consider your family? 

    I have lists of a lot of living history books, as well as children’s history, adult reading, and other wonderful picture books I can recommend; I just don’t want to offend you by recommending something that your family may be opposed to and not observe.

    I’m not at my home computer so I can’t access my list until after the Sabbath; but I’d be happy to be of help if I can.

    Blessings,

    Rachel (too!)

    ps-is your user name “ima” intentional for the Hebrew word for mother-Ema?

    ima2
    Member

    Hello Rachel!

    It is nice to meet you! My family is a pretty non traditional. lol My husband is Jewish and the son of a Conservative rabbi, and I am christian, but l am also committed to living a Jewish life. We are raising our children fully in both faiths. So we all go to church and we all go to synagogue and we do all the holidays, etc. (and also have the kids call us Ima and Abba).  We would like our children to know both modern and biblical hebrew and while I can say the prayers from hearing them regularly, I would like to be able to actually read from the siddur.  Another thing I am looking for is family friendly resources for discussing the parsha each week as a family. Any books or websites or music or other resources you could suggest that you have found helpful would be very much appreciated!!

     

    What type of shul do you attend? How exciting that your children are begining their bar/bat mitzvah classes! Have you had them in religious school all along and supplimented their education on your own or have you done it mostly at home?

    Thanks again!

    Rachel

    Mum In Zion
    Participant

    Hi Rachel.  You could check out resources from these websites…

    http://www.torahaura.com/welcome.aspx

    http://www.behrmanhouse.com/

    http://www.sarahdavid.com/

    http://www.akhlah.com/

    http://www.torahtots.com/educmtrl.htm

    http://www.hebrew4christians.com/

    This should give you some ideas of what is out there to choose from.  You can buy full curriculum (text books, workbooks, flashcards etc) or do alot online or print your own aleph bet cards and fun stuff for the holidays.  There are more websites, but that should get you started 🙂

    Shabbat Shalom, Michelle

    crazy4boys
    Participant

    We have been using Sarah and David for the past month or so and thus far, it is working very well.  It’s easy enough for me to figure out on my own (non-Hebrew speaker) with the occasional help from their website or my husband.  Retention is good and even my 5-year-old is reading like a champ.  We’re also working on phrases and vocab on our own.  After we finish this program we’ll have to decide where to go…my husband reads/speaks both Modern and Biblical so he may take over instruction or I might continue with a “curriculum”.  

    Heather

    lgeurink
    Member

    This is a book we just got but have not used yet.  I love celebrating holidays from other cultures to help understand and learn about them.

    http://www.amazon.com/Walk-YShua-Through-Jewish-Year/dp/1881022404/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316219399&sr=1-7

    ima2
    Member

    Thank you so much for the ideas! I checked out the links and have some ideas now on how to start. I found some free print outs on the hebrew for christians website for kids and adults to practice writing Hebrew letters. My dd1 is really enjoying them! I think we will take it one letter at a time for now and go from there.

     

    And thank you Heather for sharing your experience with Sarah and David! I am very frugal and like to have good recommendations and/or reviews before I buy anything!

    Thanks!

    Rachel

    Mum In Zion
    Participant

    If you search on You Tube you will find lots of free Hebrew lessons.  Our kids like this Aleph Bet song…  http://youtu.be/UiCzoTs1AdE  (Hope that works 🙂  I’ve never done a link to You Tube before!)

    Michelle

     

    Rachel White
    Participant

    Rachel,

      Michelle gave some good and helpful links. I first printed out our Aleph-Bet flashcards on cardstock years ago from Aklah.

    A little about us: We’ve attended a Messianic Jewish Synagogue for 10 yrs.,  just outside of Atlanta, Ga; Congregation Beth Hallel. My husband is a Jewish Believer, I am a gentile believer, raising up Jewish children who believe in and follow  Y’shua (Jesus) as their Messiah, who love Israel and to be fully authentic Biblically Jewish adults in the Community with both Jews and Christians. At home and corporately, we observe the L-rd’s Appointed Times, recognize and educate about, but only sometimes participate in, the minor fast days; no Christian holidays (that’s a personal decision, not dictated by the Rabbi) and no Halloween. The Resurrection is celebrated within the context of the Feast of Unleavened Bread. We don’t have a special observation about the birth, though it is read in the Scripture at Sukkot (when we believe He was born according to the Hebrew calendar using the Book of Luke), but other than reading the prophecies of His birth and the accounts in the Gospels, there isn’t a special observance other than what is done for Sukkot. We also observe privately and corporately the new Jewish special days related to the Holocaust and the State of Israel.

    I didn’t send them to religious school, but have done it myself w/ a wide variety of materials for educating myself in order to educate them and through regular attendance at shul. I’ve tried to be very intentional about creating a Jewish home that also reflects G-d’s Spirit and the fullness of His Son. I’m putting together a list of materials I’ve used through the years (and others I haven’t gotten to yet and those I wish I’d had!) that I plan on posting when finished that may be helpful. I will pull out the materials for your child’s age, though and post it. Our synagogue has been there about 30 yrs., one of the oldest and most active Messianic ones in the country, so it has a fully functioning, 2 year, Bar/Bat Mitzvah training course; we are all very excited and thankful!

      I’m going to break this up to keep it simpler. This post is about teaching the parsha that you were interested in teaching. You’ll have to piece it together yourself. Hebrew for Christians has a lot of good material, though I can’t say that it would be a thorough source for Hebrew instruction over the long term, but excellent for printing out the Blessings and learning them (I put them on index cards and add them to our SCM memory box) and background info. on the parshiot, Holidays and other articles for free. Most of these I’ve used; others I wish I had and thought they may work for you.

    T=traditional; M=Messianic; Ch=Christian

    (T) My First Parsha Reader- ages 3-8- http://www.judaism.com/display.asp?usn=128; introduction to parsha topics, characters, in story form. If you have a children’s New Covenant, you could read from the corresponding parsha reading according to the schedule from a Messianic calendar or from here: http://www.bethhallel.org/CMS/services-and-events/parashot/ (or from Hebrew for Christians)

    (T, M) First Fruits of Zion Children’s Torah Club – ages 6-10 – http://ffoz.org/torahclub/children/index.html I can’t recommend the adult version as they have changed a couple of them and some of their views that I can’t support; however, we used the children’s Torah club one year when mine were around 7/8 and it was worth the monthly amount.

    (T, M) Hey, Torah Kids! Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 – Dr. Thomas Lancaster/ FFOZ – audio story cds from Torah , New Covenant and the Sages – www.ffoz.com/index.php?target=categories&category_id=47 

    (M) Righteous Rhymes – Jamie Lash: It’s not about the parshah, but it is especially loved by my children in it’s wonderful songs and coloring pages about G-d’s Love and Message from a Jewish roots perspective, using familiar nursery rhymes:http://www.jewishjewels.org/media/righteous-rhymes/

     (T, Orthodox) Torahtots printout coloring pages for the Appointed Times and Holidays w/readings out loud from:

    Walk with Y’shua Through the Jewish Year combined with suggestions on the list I’m going to post for her age group from which you choose. Alfred Kolatch’s children’s books and the Behrman House materials have been enjoyed here.

    When she’s a little older, maybe closer to six or seven, again combined w/coloring pages if your dc likes:

    (T, M) TorahResource free children’s lesson printouts- http://torahresource.com/OtherMaterials.html

    You can use Hegg’s materials for lessons being taught from the Tanakh and from the New Covenant, and you’ll be presenting your faith in Y’shua/Jesus from within His Hebraic context, within the context of the entire Bible being a Hebrew book and G-d’s Message of Atonement coming from the Tanakh, not like being one as being Jewish and the other is Christian.

    For you, beginning studying the Parsha from the perspective of the wholeness of the Word of G-d , and the continuity of His Message through the Jewish people from the Torah to Revelation, it further enriches you and makes you prepared to better teach your dc about their Jewish identity and who Y’shua/Jesus was/is by what G-d says. That way they won’t feel torn that if they end up accepting the Messiah, they won’t think they have to give up their G-d Given identity, because they don’t according to His Word; they can be fully Jewish and fully a disciple of Y’sua at the same time.

    Dr. Feinberg’s “Walk…!” Messianic Devotional series that follows the weekly parsha. There are five, one for each of the Books of Moses for a year’s worth of study :http://www.amazon.com/Genesis-Messianic-Jewish-Devotional-Commentary/dp/1880226758 

    A free source of rich parsha study is at Tim Hegg’s site. He uses the 3-yr. Cycle, but if you scroll to the bottom, he will match it up for you. For example, for this week, on the 1 yr. It’s #51-Nitzavim which corresponds to the 3 yr. #146. So you just scroll up and click on the #146 and there are the notes on the parsha.:http://torahresource.com/Parashot.html 

    As my children got older (ages 7 till now), we liked watching the puppets on The Itche kadoozy show’s The Parshah Report, parsha video at Chabad.org: http://www.chabad.org/kids/article_cdo/aid/1361596/jewish/Parshah-Report.htm 

    Also, we enjoy listening to Jonathan Settel read the Jewish New Testament on audio. It’s worth the price. http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Online_Store/Audio/JNT/jnt.html 

    This is a great time to get started on using the parsha with the arrival of Simchat Torah! We read from the Parsha, the Haftarah and the corresponding Brit Hadashah (New Covenant) weekly. They are older, so they read the Psalms and Proverbs on their own currently.

    If I think of anything else I’ll add to it. I’ve got to go and plant seeds, but I’ll post on Hebrew next. I’ve heard of Sarah and David, but we’ve used Behrman House, since the children were 6. My son (11) and I can read from the Hebrew side of the siddur now, though he’s faster and can translate better than I! Those young brains!!Laughing

    HTH and feel free to ask any questions,

    Rachel

    Rachel White
    Participant

    I just remembered a site that I am registered with that has free materials. It has many sheets to download for different ages and for Hebrew, Parshiot, Jewish values and Holidays, etc. Much of the Hebrew uses Ashkenaz pronunciation, whereas many Hebrew courses are teaching Sephardi pronunciation since that is the Israeli form; just thought I’d give you a heads-up on that. I don’t know what your synagogue uses, ours uses Sephardi, with the occasional person using Ashkenaz because that’s how they were raised.

    Anyway, I have found some useful forms here, for supplementation; though it can be overwhelming to wade through!

    http://chinuch.org/index.php

    Rachel

    ima2
    Member

    Wow Rachel! Thank you so much for taking the time and sharing these with me! It is inspiring to see that you have worked so hard to put together a Jewish life and education for your family.  And inspiring that you can read the siddur! Our situation is different from yours as my husband is not Christian too, but I feel a real connection to you as another Christian woman who loves Judaism and fully lives a Jewish life. Most interfaith couples chose one or the other, or do both lite, and it is wonderful to see a family who has beautifully put the two together.

    Boy do I have a lot to look through! Thank you again for all of your help!

    Rachel

    P.S. I checked out the chabad videos and they are hysterical!

    Rachel White
    Participant

    Aren’t they funny?!Laughing

    Do you want me to post my living history resources (teaching Jewish history alongside secular and church history is what we do) and Hebrew resources? The main reason I’m compiling them in an organized manner is so my experinces can be useful to others.

    Although my husband is a Jewish Believer, too, I’m the driving force behind teaching due to his chronic health problems (seizures/chronic headaches/neck and back pain), not to mention my love of history and enjoyment of researching. So even with his beliefs, the responsibility lies more so with me to teach and get them to shul regularly. Beyond what I’ve learned at my shul, as their main teacher (morah) it’s been up to me to educate myself, as I was raised as a Methodist preacher’s dd, these past ten years. We have many interfaith families in our Congregation, too.

    If you are interested in knowing of any books I read for myself only (and sometimes read aloud to my husband), I’d be happy to share there, too; it’s so enriching for this wild olive who is grafted-in (Romans 11), to share in the rich root of the olive tree; being one who is a spiritual seed of Avraham and fellow-citizen with G-d’s people (Eph. 2).

    Rachel

    Melissa Henson
    Participant

    Rachel ~ I would be interested in your living history resources.  I have yet to find a way to teach history that aligns with my beliefs.  I would be interested to see what you have used with the younger children (mine are 7 and 8).

    Thank you so much for all of the information you listed above!

    Melissa

    jennyandben
    Participant

    Rachel,

    I see this is an old thread. I am interested in your list of living history books also. I don’t see it posted here. Did you PM the others who were interested?

    Thank you!!

    Jenny

    Rachel White
    Participant

    I either emailed or PMed. I don’t know how to pm on this new version of the site, though.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
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