Topic | Getty Dubay or Zaner Bolser?

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Rebekahy
    Participant

    I’m still having a hard time deciding on how/what to teach my DD for cursive.  I really like Getty Dubay, because it’s very similar to my own eclectic style of handwriting – a mix of print and cursive based on what has been easier and more appealing for me to use.  My husband is more fond of the flowery script, but is ok with whatever I choose because I have shared with him how inept I feel about teaching cursive (the only subject I ever got a “C” in – scarred for life – now I see why NOT grading is so appealing to me). Laughing

    I was really leaning toward using the Getty Dubay program, but just found Queen’s pictures in cursive and it looks lovely – tragically there’s no way that I could actually demonstrate it for my DD.

    Am I missing any super great reasons for her to learn the lovely script of Zaner Bolser or will the more practical Getty Dubay be sufficient?

    Thanks!

    Rebekah

    suzukimom
    Participant

    Well, as there is debate out “there” on whether cursive is needed at all (I say it is…) – I say use whatever style of cursive you desire.  Any would be sufficient.

    Tukata
    Participant

    Yes, I wouldn’t stress too much!  My aunt, who is a teacher in the public school system, said that our state (or her school district? Not sure how this works…) will no longer be teaching cursive effective this year.  They will teaching typing in 3rd grade instead as they don’t see the value of teaching cursive.  We are doing italics for handwriting – haven’t gotten to cursive yet, but I do plan on teaching cursive, even if our state doesn’t.  I can’t imagine not knowing it!

    4myboys
    Participant

    My older son had very basic instruction in cursive at PS in 3rd grade, and none at all in 4th.  I think in this age of computers cursive is quikly becoming a lost art.  However, they also do not teach printing, so both of my boys have learned a lot of bad habits that will need to be trained out of them.  I am struggling myself as to whether or not to teach cursive.  With my son’s dysgraphia, printing is hard enough.  Typing is a definate.  I am considering Italics because the transition to cursive appears much easier, and it’s a lot easier to read without all the loops and letters that look nothining like their printed form (I never understood why Q had to look like a 2).  My own handwriting is also a mix of print and cursive (I used to get in trouble for it at school), as is my mother’s.  The problem with Italics is that we would all be learning printing from scratch as well.  Perhaps it will be more of an encouragement to my boys if I am learning it along with them.  The most important thing to me is that they be able to sign a legible signature. 

    suzukimom
    Participant

    The most important thing to me is that they be able to sign a legible signature.

     

    I want my kids to be able to write cursive (and absolutely they need to be able to read various forms of cursive)… but I don’t care if they have a legible signature…  I want them to have a unique one.

    I used to have a legible signature…. and it was easy for people to copy it.  (My step-daugter wrote notes to her school in my name… found out when I had to go to her school for some reason, and there happened to be a note “by me” on the office counter….  they hadn’t called me about it (and hadn’t suspected it) and that wasn’t why I was there.   I told the office that it wasn’t by me, and that I would not write her any notes – so they should only trust notes from her dad.  Yes, it was only my step-daugter getting out of gym, but it opened my eyes.

    I changed my signature…. it is now a LOT harder to copy, and it is my “mark” so to speak.

     

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Free basic shipping on USA orders over $75!