Topic | Fantasy books

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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • artcmomto3
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    My 10 y/o DS loves fantasy. We have read all the Narnia books as a family. He started to read “The Hobbit” last year but became bored with it. I’m not sure if there was not enough action as I have not read it myself and don’t know, but that is what he claims. Are there any other books that would be good options? I’m not sure I want to to pursue Harry Potter.

    I made the mistake of picking up a couple of books from a series at the library on a whim. I skimmed a page at home and was shocked at the gore! I need to go to the library prepared next time.

    sarah2106
    Participant

    We are working our way through the Kingdom Series by Chuck Black and they are really enjoyable. They are fantasy/allegory action and adventure.

    The Hobbit it good, but like Lord of the Rings it is “wordy” (thought hobbit not as wordy as LOTR) and you have to be ready for it is how I explain it, LOL. My ODS has told me that he wants to read the Hobbit (he is 9), but knowing him I told him to wait a couple of years that way it will be more fun to enjoy.

    4myboys
    Participant

    My 4th grade teacher read us The Hobbit in school, and a couple years later I found and read an illustrated version of the whole book, which I loved, though I have no idea what may have happened to it over the years.  I’m sure my boys would have loved it.  I have attempted to read it to my boys, but we found the pacing very slow. Today’s kids don’t always have the attention span for that style of writing, and while we try, I think it would help to opt for the audio version of the slower books and play them while engaged in other tasks.  When my boys were younger that was often while eating lunch or clearing up after supper, or even folding laundry.

    As for Fantasy for a 10 year old, more current stuff might include Peter Nimble and the Fantastic Eyes, and the sequel Sophie Quire were good – not high fantasy (kinghts, kings, queens etc) but fantastical without being too dark.  One Hundred Cupboards and the two books that follow it were good, (those would also have darker elements that The Chronicles of Narnia, which is very tame).  Although more humorous adventure than fantasy, The Very Nearly Honourable League of Pirates books are a fun read for both boys and girls.

    As for Harry Potter and the rest — it really depends on your personal convictions.  We have read them all (my older son and I) several years ago, and enjoyed them, but he is not the type to get “wrapped up” in the “wizarding world”.  My younger son is a little different, and we haven’t read them.  We’ve also read Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson novels, etc, and I am not at all impressed by his newer works.  I have found reading the “controversial” books with my kids (even at 16 and 13) allows me to 1) know what they are reading, 2)make “edits” when necessary, 3) have conversations about the believes, actions and thoughts of both the characters in the story and the author that might be contrary to our own.  We can talk about how God’s truth tells us something very different than what the author is portraying at times, and what the consequences of those false beliefs are.

    HollyS
    Participant

    We are reading The Hobbit aloud, maybe that would help?  I think the length of the chapters has been a stumbling block for my DC.  We often break the chapter into 2-3 readings.  My kids want to read through a chapter in one sitting, which isn’t easy with this book!

    My kids loved the Warriors books at this age.  To be honest, I didn’t pre-read them, but they were popular with my DD’s homeschool friends, so I figured they were okay.  lol

    Karen
    Participant

    One of my friends wrote a blog post on fantasy books… it’s here here, at her blog.

    I read and enjoyed the Princess Academy books (I think there are 3 or 4 in the series) — but that might not appeal to your son! *L*

    I personally didn’t care for the 100 Cupboards….and I found Peter Nimble sort of annoying…. but that’s just me!

    On the topic of choosing fantasy for our children to read,  A Landscape with Dragons: The Battle for Your Child’s Mind by Michael D. O’Brien is fabulous.  It’s from a Catholic point of view, but has very applicable tests to apply to fantasy to see whether it lines up with a Christian point of view.  It is older, so it doesn’t include any of the newer fantasy titles in its lists, but it is still very much worth reading.

    Monica
    Participant

    The Wizard of Oz series could be a nice option.

    Poppy
    Participant

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>How about the Wingfeather Saga series by Andrew Peterson?</p>
    Or The Green Ember by S.D. Smith?

    Poppy
    Participant

    Not sure why that last post looked funny…..

    alphabetika
    Participant
Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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