Topic | Early Arithmetic Book 1 Questions

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  • Betty Dickerson
    Participant

    My newly turned 8yr old girl is finishing up Early Arithmetic book 1. She has dyslexia and other processing challenges. She is pretty bright with math and can often do the problems in her head. BUT she can not do a problem if I only read it once. Many times, I will write the numbers on a white board as I come to it in the word problem. I try to transition to her writing the numbers down after I read the whole problem and she can’t remember them. Then I tried reading the problem to the first number and then have her write it and then the second problem but then she can’t remember what the problem was asking. But once the problem is on the white board, she can do it pretty well. Is this an expected accommodation for learning issues? I feel guilty on the one hand for the way we are doing things, but then see that given a problem written down she has the ability to do it so that is a big win. She would probably do great with a sheet of straight math problems but I don’t want her to miss out on truly understanding the process of math.

    Betty Dickerson
    Participant

    Just want to bump this up hoping Richelle will chime in.

    Tamara Bell
    Moderator

    Momma,

    Charlotte’s method is only a method.  It’s not a rigid system that must be followed to a ‘T’.  Each child is a unique individual made in the image of the Creator.  It sounds like you’ve found what she needs done for her.  She will have exposure to mental math again in Book 2, 3, etc.  I encourage you to tweak the book to fit your daughter.  If she needs it written, then please feel freedom in doing so.  I would still plug along with the mental aspect of the lessons but I would not do it to the point of frustrating her (aka the whole lesson).  Perhaps practice a few mental math and then allow her to write the problem (numbers) on the white board or you sit next to her and do it as you read the problem.  Or start with writing a few on the white board as you read the problem aloud but then finish the lesson with a few mental problems.

    Richele
    Participant

    Hi Betty,
    As you balance this for your child, I’d like to give you a few additional ideas of things to do. We can’t physically see the neural paths forming so I agree that you don’t want to stop working on holding digits in one’s head altogether while you also don’t want the lesson to be constant frustration.

    You’ll see scattered throughout the book “Numeration and Notation” (see p. 127). You might try putting these exercises in a bit more often. That could mean a number of them once a week or add a few to your daily lesson. Just as with dictation, adjust the speed for your child.

    You could keep the mental portion for smaller numbers that you increasingly bump up to larger numbers as able.

    Have her repeat entire problems back to you without worrying about providing the solution.

    Have her think of mental math problems to give you.

    If you have cards with the numbers through 100, she can physically pull the numbers out as you say the problem (again, adjust the speed accordingly).

    I hope these ideas are helpful.

    Warmly,
    Richele

    Betty Dickerson
    Participant

    This IS helpful!  There are some problems that she does totally in her head and it amazes me!!  Then when other require more thinking by the time I get to the end of the arithmetic sentence, she’s forgotten every number.

    I love these suggestions. I forget that I can step outside the book and have her do things like give me problems!!  Or to just remember the numbers and not solve. I know this will stretch her and build into her more of an understanding of how math works rather than merely be able to solve problems on a page. I’m still not fully aware or understanding of all of my daughter’s challenges so these ideas and remembering there’s freedom within the method are so helpful. 💗

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