Topic | Canadian Spelling Wisdom

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • suzukimom
    Participant

    I have been considering using “Spelling Wisdom” in the future.  I notice there is a US spelling and a UK spelling version…   but sob sob I need a Canadian version… lol

    I want words like  colour and neighbour and cheque, etc… (instead of the U.S. versions of color and neighbor and check)…    but I also want jail and I’m sure lots of other words (instead of the UK gaol – and whatever else…)

    any suggestions???  This is something I can see being an issue no matter what spelling program I use (unless it is Canadian)….

    Sue
    Participant

    Wow, I had never thought about those differences before, being from the U.S. myself.  I wonder if the market would warrant the time, effort, and cost of offering a Canadian version.

    Sorry I don’t have any other curriculum suggestions for our neighbors, um, make that “neighbours” to the north! Wink

    Sue

    suzukimom
    Participant

    I am probably being a little old-fashioned wanting the proper Canadian spellings, because honestly many Canadians spell like the US anyway….  (and some even say “Zee” instead of “Zed” – drives me nuts! 

    My kids learned it was “Zed” instead of “Zee” when I told them they couldn’t watch the American kid shows (like super-why) if it was going to teach them things that are wrong (where we live…)  I did explain that it was the right name in the U.S. of course, but it is wrong here…. they learned quick!

    I just worry about the spelling, as so many books they will be reading will have american spelling, same with quotes they will be doing for copywork (as I don’t want to change the spelling in an original quote!) etc….  and I wonder how my kids will learn what is proper here.  Again, maybe I’m worrying about something that doesn’t matter anymore and may make them eventually look archaic!

    Linabean
    Participant

    Well, we live in Alberta, Canada and I have often wondered and thought about these things as well! Also about the seeming lack of really good, living, Canadian history books (just saying!). I don’t think that there is anything wrong with spelling the U.S. way, I just would like my kids to know the Canadian way and, most importantly (IMHO), to know that there is a difference! I think it is important for people to have a real connection with the country and heritage that belongs to them and not just be mashed up with everyone else! Spelling is just one little thing really, but it is something that I wonder about how to properly teach in a Canadian way!

    So, you are not alone, Suzukimom!

    Rachel White
    Participant

    The only idea I can come up with is when you print out the SW page for copywork/dictation, white out the “misspelled” word and correct it your way. So when they copy it, they will see the Canadian version. Eventually, after years of doing this, I think they will have the Canadian spelling in their head while reading and copying American or English books and , poer your permission, copy it the canadian way even though it has an American or English spelling.

    I do similar things with Hebrew replacements to the many “Christianized” words in speech and in the Scripture and in Bible studies; for example, automatically converting Jesus into Yeshua on the written page and in their minds when reading. As the years have gone by, combined with our own Messianic Jewish materials, the verbal reinforcement and daily speech, and writing practice in Hebrew, they replace the words themselves and they are 9 and 10.

    Does that make sense? You may not even have to do it with every lesson, just check before each lesson.

    HTH, Rachel

    suzukimom
    Participant

    Linabean – I’m hijacking my own thread.. lol!

    I am working a bit on what we are doing for our Canadian History, and literature, etc…   You can check my blog for my Canadian History Plan…  they aren’t as great of books as I’d like… but for now they are ok…  

    In our first couple of years I have a few Canadian Lit books too  (hey, is it just me but except for Lucy Maud Montgomery, is there a real lack of Canadian literature until about 1950…

    Right now I’m trying to pick out Canadian Folk Songs for a few years of folk songs (although my kids know tonnes already…)    and soon (if I still have energy) pick a few more Canadian artists for art study.  (I have links to some Robert Bateman – plan to add in Emily Carr, and the group of 7 sometimes…)

    http://maplehillacademy.blogspot.com/2011/02/canadian-history-plan-updated.html

     

    Linabean
    Participant

    Thanks!

    It sounds as though you are much more planned for the long term than I am! Haha!

    I am hoping to be able to keep our Canadian studies in the general timeline of our world history studies. So right now we are taking our time studying the native peoples, how they came to be here and what they lived like before the Europeans started coming over. I have been hard pressed (at least in our library) to find living books about how they lived and who they were. Almost all the books that are laid out in story format seem to be just focused on the myths and beliefs that they had. That is alright in a small dosage but it doesn’t really tell us, in story form, how they lived, ate, day to day life, etc. Most books that explain that part of it are pretty textbookish! I will just try to keep scouring our library shelves whenever we go in, I guess!

    Anyway, thanks for the link and as far as Canadian spelling goes, I think that Rachel may have the only idea that would really work in a realistic way.

    God Bless! Happy Canadian Studying!

    -Miranda

    houseofchaos
    Participant

    We use it exactly as Rachel outlined, and it works fine for us.

    teachme2learn
    Participant

    I am a Canadian mom living in the U.S.  When I was growing up in Canada I had an American elementary teacher, first grade actually, which made things interesting.  I remember being told that the way we spelled ‘neighbour’ was different than those in the States.  At the time I really didn’t care but I knew.  Now I teach my own children and they spell the American way and I the Canadian way. Oh, another twist is that we use the KJV for memory work and copywork which, of course, uses King’s English.  I think if you tell them that there are differences and point them out, children put that snippet away in their brain for another time.  I think children are very adaptable.  Now I could be wrong on this but as of now that is my experience.

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