After Brushing Drawing course

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  • Bek
    Participant

    After doing Richelle’s Brush Drawing course which beautifully demonstrated the basics of brush drawing what do you recommend for the older students and mothers who wish to take this to the next level and beyond? I like how Richelle has given very specific step by step instructions and we would really like to continue in this fashion rather than haphazardly trying to figure out technique for ourselves.

    I don’t mind older books but if there is some tutorial series that’s recommended I’d love to be directed to it.

     

    Thanks

    Richele Baburina
    Participant

    Hello, Bek. The best thing I know is to take what you’ve learned & practice with specimens from nature using the questions set in the manual as a guide. Looking at the flower/plant/berries, determine which strokes you’ll use (are the leaves made of two double-curved strokes?). Once all the initial strokes are put to paper, add some detail by laying down the same color again to make the shaded parts or lifting off highlights & veins. If you keep the drawing lesson time, you might focus on drawing a flower from the side or slightly turned rather than straight on. Like musical notes combined to make music, all the strokes can be combined to paint almost anything.

    You might want to get some larger and smaller brushes now to capture larger leaves or more detail.

    In addition to nature journaling, narrations can be brush drawn & Picture Study can be enriched by painting a detail (or the whole) of the picture being studied. Try using just one color for this and the painting becomes a lesson in composition and (tonal) value.

    If you’re on Instagram, I post tips & techniques @rbaburina.

    Let me know if that doesn’t answer your question.

    Richele

    Bek
    Participant

    Hi Richele,

    Thank you so much for your considered reply. It sounds both logical and doable. I will definitely follow your Instagram page. The slow a deliberate way you use and incorporate the exercises in your course reminds me of my ballet training- the basic moves must be mastered and built upon and everything else stems from that. I appreciate you taking the time to reply (and sorry for misspelling your name!)

    Bek

    Richele Baburina
    Participant

    Bek, yes! Your analogy sounds perfect and I’d love to use it, if possible. Am I correct in thinking you have seven movements in ballet that provide the basis for all else?

    I once received a fortune cookie that read “There are only 3 colors, 10 digits, and 7 notes; it’s what we do with them that’s important.”

    This pertains to so many things in life. So, in the course, you’ve been perfecting this handful of basic strokes while also gaining an artist’s hand and eye. The fluidity of the strokes are like the fluidity of your ballet movements.

    If you do follow me on IG, I’d be thankful if you let me know it’s you in a comment or dm and would be happy for you to carry the analogy further with your insight.

    In appreciation,
    Richele

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